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{{task}}

A [[wp:Quine_%28computing%29|Quine]] is a self-referential program that can, without any external access, output its own source.

It is named after the [[wp:Willard_Van_Orman_Quine|philosopher and logician]] who studied self-reference and quoting in natural language, as for example in the paradox "'Yields falsehood when preceded by its quotation' yields falsehood when preceded by its quotation."

"Source" has one of two meanings. It can refer to the text-based program source. For languages in which program source is represented as a data structure, "source" may refer to the data structure: quines in these languages fall into two categories: programs which print a textual representation of themselves, or expressions which evaluate to a data structure which is equivalent to that expression.

The usual way to code a Quine works similarly to this paradox: The program consists of two identical parts, once as plain code and once ''quoted'' in some way (for example, as a character string, or a literal data structure). The plain code then accesses the quoted code and prints it out twice, once unquoted and once with the proper quotation marks added. Often, the plain code and the quoted code have to be nested.

;Task: Write a program that outputs its own source code in this way. If the language allows it, you may add a variant that accesses the code directly. You are not allowed to read any external files with the source code. The program should also contain some sort of self-reference, so constant expressions which return their own value which some top-level interpreter will print out. Empty programs producing no output are not allowed.

There are several difficulties that one runs into when writing a quine, mostly dealing with quoting:

  • Part of the code usually needs to be stored as a string or structural literal in the language, which needs to be quoted somehow. However, including quotation marks in the string literal itself would be troublesome because it requires them to be escaped, which then necessitates the escaping character (e.g. a backslash) in the string, which itself usually needs to be escaped, and so on. ** Some languages have a function for getting the "source code representation" of a string (i.e. adds quotation marks, etc.); in these languages, this can be used to circumvent the quoting problem. ** Another solution is to construct the quote character from its [[character code]], without having to write the quote character itself. Then the character is inserted into the string at the appropriate places. The ASCII code for double-quote is 34, and for single-quote is 39.
  • Newlines in the program may have to be reproduced as newlines in the string, which usually requires some kind of escape sequence (e.g. "\n"). This causes the same problem as above, where the escaping character needs to itself be escaped, etc. ** If the language has a way of getting the "source code representation", it usually handles the escaping of characters, so this is not a problem. ** Some languages allow you to have a string literal that spans multiple lines, which embeds the newlines into the string without escaping. ** Write the entire program on one line, for free-form languages (as you can see for some of the solutions here, they run off the edge of the screen), thus removing the need for newlines. However, this may be unacceptable as some languages require a newline at the end of the file; and otherwise it is still generally good style to have a newline at the end of a file. (The task is not clear on whether a newline is required at the end of the file.) Some languages have a print statement that appends a newline; which solves the newline-at-the-end issue; but others do not.

'''Next to the Quines presented here, many other versions can be found on the [http://www.nyx.net/~gthompso/quine.htm Quine] page.'''

ABAP

I copied one of my examples from http://www.yaabb.de/viewtopic.php?t=44

REPORT R NO STANDARD PAGE HEADING LINE-SIZE 67.
DATA:A(440),B,C,N(3) TYPE N,I TYPE I,S.
A+000 = 'REPORT R NO STANDARD PAGE HEADING LINE-SIZE 6\7.1DATA:A'.
A+055 = '(440),B,C,N(\3) TYPE N,I TYPE I,S.?1DO 440 TIMES.3C = A'.
A+110 = '+I.3IF B = S.5IF C CA `\\\?\1\3\5\7`.7B = C.5ELSEIF C ='.
A+165 = ' `\``.7WRITE ```` NO-GAP.5ELSE.7WRITE C NO-GAP.5ENDIF.3'.
A+220 = 'ELSEIF B = `\\`.5WRITE C NO-GAP.5B = S.3ELSEIF B = `\?`'.
A+275 = '.5DO 8 TIMES.7WRITE:/ `A+` NO-GAP,N,`= ``` NO-GAP,A+N(\'.
A+330 = '5\5) NO-GAP,```.`.7N = N + \5\5.5ENDDO.5B = C.3ELSE.5WR'.
A+385 = 'ITE AT /B C NO-GAP.5B = S.3ENDIF.3I = I + \1.1ENDDO.   '.
DO 440 TIMES.
  C = A+I.
  IF B = S.
    IF C CA '\?1357'.
      B = C.
    ELSEIF C = '`'.
      WRITE '''' NO-GAP.
    ELSE.
      WRITE C NO-GAP.
    ENDIF.
  ELSEIF B = '\'.
    WRITE C NO-GAP.
    B = S.
  ELSEIF B = '?'.
    DO 8 TIMES.
      WRITE:/ 'A+' NO-GAP,N,'= ''' NO-GAP,A+N(55) NO-GAP,'''.'.
      N = N + 55.
    ENDDO.
    B = C.
  ELSE.
    WRITE AT /B C NO-GAP.
    B = S.
  ENDIF.
  I = I + 1.
ENDDO.

Here is another one, requiring SY-SAPRL >= '620':

REPORT R NO STANDARD PAGE HEADING.DATA:A TYPE TABLE OF STRING,B(8).APPEND:
`REPORT.FORM F TABLES T.NEW-PAGE LINE-SIZE 78.WRITE:'REPORT R NO',` TO A,
`'STANDARD PAGE HEADING.DATA:A TYPE TABLE OF STRING,B(8).APPEND:'.LOOP` TO A,
`AT T.REPLACE ALL OCCURENCES OF'``' IN T WITH'````'.WRITE:/'``'` TO A,
`NO-GAP,T NO-GAP,'`` TO A,'.ENDLOOP.WRITE:AT 78'.','GENERATE',` TO A,
`'SUBROUTINE POOL A NAME B.PERFORM F IN PROGRAM (B) TABLES A.'.ENDFORM.` TO A.
GENERATE SUBROUTINE POOL A NAME B.PERFORM F IN PROGRAM (B) TABLES A.

Please note that the program still works if you fix the spelling error (s/OCCURENCES/OCCURRENCES/), thus increasing the size of the source code by 1 character.

One more program, created in a 7.0 unicode system, but it should work in any SAP system with SY-SAPRL >= '700', even if you'll have a hard time verifying the correctness just by studying the source code:

REPORT A NO STANDARD
PAGE HEADING
LINE-SIZE
72.DATA:C(33),A LIKE
TABLE OF C,X(3333)
TYPE X,Y TYPE
XSTRING.DEFINE A.X+C
='&1'.C = C + 33.
END-OF-DEFINITION.
DEFINE B.LOOP AT A
INTO C &1 &2.WRITE
/ C.ENDLOOP.
END-OF-DEFINITION.
A FF060201020280003431303300000000AC030000121F9D02BB522ADA69108AA1C7 .
A E8B32FFEC07DD21907936962B28407983089732C8811FC4413FD02A7BFE6690B03 .
A 262F72B38EF69EB6A7A71C9F82CF44CC11469E081F86785777F269DE372CE9EC4B .
A 5E0A24D8224781128E290E1B7A0ECFF423BEDFD316B43B456FE9AD98E1F0401B31 .
A 9E11B3A23F3C865EEB6D028FD532BC69DED831F41DE6F0B59F745E604996373C97 .
A 982A2FA9F6C81A86164CCC98D4CC91D22E89AB9A1CCBEB6A97A839A5602BA26AFE .
A 7791BF4C2A9DBE6866134E093BD82CA291CF2A57EC67E81017384740EB33E6102A .
A 174784531EFEA076A29A7ACAD9EB55CED8316374D3E00D3DEC1CF36E4D4C4EE64E .
A 75B28DB568C195BA3DE92F9CC48AAAAF3A4DD9CC6BE899E27C18A3B66ECBF65093 .
A FFF1168545878AD10C4F075F588821EF947739516EBF7D99F5851D52F629E8D5AC .
A 13EF77291306AA6CABF7B56EC9E273F47997DA3FE146FB2A2C30E3BE22FEA603B4 .
A EDB5FBEE64A7637B35B46DD79491EEC2D1A19B26C0ADAAB2FB39F9050000000000 .
Y = X.IMPORT A = A
FROM DATA BUFFER Y.B
TO 13.C = 0.DO 12
TIMES.WRITE:/'A',
X+C(33),'.'.C = C +
33.ENDDO.B FROM 14.

And a final one (cheating, even though not using READ REPORT), it should work in any SAP system with SY-SAPRL >= '46B':

.REPORT Q NO STANDARD PAGE HEADING LINE-SIZE 72
.DATA QQ(69) OCCURS 0
.DATA Q LIKE QQ WITH HEADER LINE
.APPEND 'SYNTAX-TRACE ON.INCLUDE' TO QQ
.APPEND SY-REPID TO QQ
.APPEND '.' TO QQ
.SYNTAX-CHECK FOR QQ MESSAGE Q LINE Q WORD Q TRACE-TABLE Q
.LOOP AT Q
.CHECK Q(1) = '#'
.Q = Q+5
.IF Q < Q OR SY-SAPRL > '5'
.SPLIT Q AT '' INTO Q Q
.ENDIF
.IF Q < Q OR SY-LINNO < 22
.CHECK Q CA 'Q.' OR Q+4 = 'F'
.ENDIF
.IF Q < Q OR SY-LINNO > 23
.CHECK Q CA '.'
.ENDIF
.CHECK Q(1) NA 'IT+' OR Q+1(1) = 'F'
.WRITE / '.' NO-GAP
.WRITE Q
.ENDLOOP
.WRITE / '.'
.

ACL2

(defun print-quine (quine)
   (cw quine quine))
(print-quine
"(defun print-quine (quine)
  (cw quine quine))
(print-quine ~x0)~%")

A shorter one:

(let((q"(let((q~x0))(cw q q))"))(cw q q))

Ada

The program text must be in one line.

with Ada.Text_IO;procedure Self is Q:Character:='"';A:String:="with Ada.Text_IO;procedure Self is Q:Character:='&#39;;A:String:=;begin Ada.Text_IO.Put_Line(A(1..49)&Q&A(50..61)&Q&A&Q&A(62..A'Last));end Self;";begin Ada.Text_IO.Put_Line(A(1..49)&Q&A(50..61)&Q&A&Q&A(62..A'Last));end Self;

Aime

integer f;
text s, t;

f = 36;
s = "integer f;
text s, t;

f = 36;
s = \"\";

o_text(cut(s, 0, f));
o_text(cut(s, 0, f - 1));
o_etext(cut(s, f - 1, 2));
o_text(cut(s, f + 1, 8888 - f));
o_text(cut(s, f, 8888 - f));
";

o_text(cut(s, 0, f));
o_text(cut(s, 0, f - 1));
o_etext(cut(s, f - 1, 2));
o_text(cut(s, f + 1, 8888 - f));
o_text(cut(s, f, 8888 - f));

ALGOL 68

The following program assumes that the target machine is ASCII, hence the use of character 34 as a double quote.

STRINGa="STRINGa=,q=REPR34;print(a[:8]+q+a+q+a[9:])",q=REPR34;print(a[:8]+q+a+q+a[9:])

The following is a shorter and character set independent - hence portable - implementation.

[]CHARa="[]CHARa="";print(2*a[:9]+2*a[9:])";print(2*a[:9]+2*a[9:])

The original program - from which this is derived - was written by Richard Wendland, who is one of the team who implemented Algol 68 on Honeywell's Multics. [http://portal.acm.org/ft_gateway.cfm?id=1061754&type=pdf The original can be found in Algol Bulletin 46 - 2.1 - Page 5].

Applesoft BASIC




## AutoHotkey

All from http://www.autohotkey.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=14336:
The "cheating" way:

```AutoHotkey
FileRead, quine, %A_ScriptFullPath%
MsgBox % quine

Another:

D(n, s)
{
   global
   Loop %n%
   {
      l := %s%%A_Index%
      If l = #
         l := "script =" . nl . "( %" . nl . script . nl . ")"
      FileAppend %l%%nl%, %A_ScriptDir%\Q.txt
   }
}
nl := Chr(13) . Chr(10)
script =
( %
D(n, s)
{
   global
   Loop %n%
   {
      l := %s%%A_Index%
      If l = #
         l := "script =" . nl . "( %" . nl . script . nl . ")"
      FileAppend %l%%nl%, %A_ScriptDir%\Q.txt
   }
}
nl := Chr(13) . Chr(10)
#
StringSplit q, script, %nl%
D(q0, "q")
)
StringSplit q, script, %nl%
D(q0, "q")

Another:

quote := Chr(34)
sep := Chr(36)
nl := Chr(13) . Chr(10)
script := "quote := Chr(34)$sep := Chr(36)$nl := Chr(13) . Chr(10)$script := #$s := script$StringReplace script, script, %sep%, %nl%, All$StringReplace script, script, #, %quote%%s%%quote%$FileAppend %script%, %A_ScriptDir%\Q.txt"
s := script
StringReplace script, script, %sep%, %nl%, All
StringReplace script, script, #, %quote%%s%%quote%
FileAppend %script%, %A_ScriptDir%\Q.txt
Another "cheating" method:
FileCopy, %A_ScriptFullPath%, %A_ScriptDir%\Copy-Of--%A_ScriptName%

AWK

version 1


BEGIN{c="BEGIN{c=%c%s%c;printf(c,34,c,34);}";printf(c,34,c,34);}

version 2


BEGIN{c="BEGIN{c=%c%s%c;printf c,34,c,34}";printf c,34,c,34}

Babel

Demonstrating from the commandline:

% bin/babel quine.sp
{ "{ '{ ' << dup [val 0x22 0xffffff00 ] dup <- << << -> << ' ' << << ' }' << } !" { '{ ' << dup [val 0x22 0xffffff00 ] dup <- << << -> << ' ' << << '}' << } ! }%
%
% cat quine.sp
{ "{ '{ ' << dup [val 0x22 0xffffff00 ] dup <- << << -> << ' ' << << ' }' << } !" { '{ ' << dup [val 0x22 0xffffff00 ] dup <- << << -> << ' ' << << '}' << } ! }%
%

Demonstrating in interactive mode:

% bin/babel
babel> { "{ '{ ' << dup [val 0x22 0xffffff00 ] dup <- << << -> << ' ' << << ' }' << } !" { '{ ' << dup [val 0x22 0xffffff00 ] dup <- << << -> << ' ' << << '}' << } ! }
babel> eval
{ "{ '{ ' << dup [val 0x22 0xffffff00 ] dup <- << << -> << ' ' << << ' }' << } !" { '{ ' << dup [val 0x22 0xffffff00 ] dup <- << << -> << ' ' << << '
}' << } !}babel>
babel>

BASIC

{{header|ZX Spectrum Basic}} For dialects of BASIC that include the LIST command, Quines are trivial.



For dialects that include the <code>DATA</code> keyword, it is almost as easy.
{{works with|QBasic}}

```qbasic
READ d$
DO
    READ x$
    PRINT x$
LOOP UNTIL LEN(x$) < 1
RESTORE
DO
    READ x$
    PRINT d$; CHR$(34); x$; CHR$(34)
LOOP UNTIL LEN(x$) < 1
END

DATA "DATA "
DATA "READ d$"
DATA "DO"
DATA "    READ x$"
DATA "    PRINT x$"
DATA "LOOP UNTIL LEN(x$) < 1"
DATA "RESTORE"
DATA "DO"
DATA "    READ x$"
DATA "    PRINT d$; CHR$(34); x$; CHR$(34)"
DATA "LOOP UNTIL LEN(x$) < 1"
DATA "END"
DATA ""

=

BaCon

=

?SOURCE$;

or more in line with the task description

a$=SOURCE$:?a$;

{{out}}

prompt$ echo -n 'a$=SOURCE$:?a$;' > quine.bac
prompt$ bacon -q quine.bac
Converting 'quine.bac'... done, 0 lines were processed in 0.005 seconds.
Compiling 'quine.bac'... cc  -c quine.bac.c
cc -o quine quine.bac.o -lbacon -lm
Done, program 'quine' ready.
prompt$ ./quine
a$=SOURCE$:?a$;prompt$

If the source file ends in a newline it will work just as well, the newline will be part of the quine.

And one that is a little less cheaty and a little more meaty:

s$="s$=%c%s%c:?34,s$,34 FORMAT s$":?34,s$,34 FORMAT s$

{{out}}

prompt$ ./quine2
s$="s$=%c%s%c:?34,s$,34 FORMAT s$":?34,s$,34 FORMAT s$prompt$

=

Sinclair ZX81 BASIC

= We can of course do it trivially with 10 LIST; but, if that feels like cheating, we can also PEEK the source code out of memory and print it.

Works with 1k of RAM.

  10 LET L$="10"
  20 LET I=VAL "16512"
  30 PRINT TAB (VAL "4"-LEN L$);L$;
  40 LET I=I+VAL "1"
  50 LET C=PEEK I
  60 IF C=VAL "118" THEN GOTO VAL "90"
  70 PRINT CHR$ C;
  80 GOTO VAL "40"
  90 PRINT
 100 LET L$=STR$ (VAL L$+VAL "10")
 110 LET I=I+VAL "4"
 120 IF VAL L$<=VAL "120" THEN GOTO VAL "30"

{{out}} Exactly the same.

A couple of notes on how it works:

(1) all the numbers in the source code are dressed up as strings, so that the interpreter does not parse them as numbers and include their floating-point representation in the tokenized source;

(2) when the system lists a program, it allocates four columns for the line number—we replicate this behaviour;

(3) character 118 is the new line character.

bash

mapfile < $0
printf "%s" ${MAPFILE[@]}
history | tail -n 1 | cut -c 8-

Batch File

@type %0

For Windows 2000 and later only:

@type "%~f0"

BBC BASIC

{{works with|BBC BASIC for Windows}}

      PRINT $(PAGE+22)$(PAGE+21):REM PRINT $(PAGE+22)$(PAGE+21):REM

{{works with|ARM BBC BASIC}}

      PRINT $(PAGE+23)$(PAGE+22):REM PRINT $(PAGE+23)$(PAGE+22):REM

beeswax

Instruction pointers in beeswax programs can drop values in their own source code (growing the program space, if necessary), or pick up values from everywhere in the source code.

_4~++~+.@1~0@D@1J

or

*4~++~+.@1~0@D@1J

The instruction pointer starts at the left, travels to the right, and at instruction D the IP drops the current value at the top of its own stack—96, or ASCII value for ` —left of the source code, which changes the program to:

`_4~++~+.@1~0@D@1J

or

`*4~++~+.@1~0@D@1J

respectively.

Arriving at instruction J (jump) the instruction pointer jumps to the newly dropped instruction, which switches the IP to print out mode, and it outputs every encountered symbol or value to STDOUT until it encounters the next ` or the program ends.

A version that does not modify itself:

`_4~++~+.}1fJ

Befunge

The code space is also the data space of a Befunge program. Programs can be read and modified on the fly. This quine works by reading and printing each character of the source. (This is a implicit loop, since the Befunge codespace wraps around.)

:0g,:66+`#@_1+

Bob


c=","; n="\n"; q="\""; s="\\";
v=\[
"c=\",\"; n=\"\\n\"; q=\"\\\"\"; s=\"\\\\\";",
"v=\\[",
"define prtQuote(str) {",
" local j,t,v;",
" stdout.Display(q);",
" for (j=0; j<str.size; j++) {",
"  t = str.Substring(j,1);",
"  if (t==q) { stdout.Display(s); }",
"  if (t==s) { stdout.Display(s); }",
"  stdout.Display(t);",
" }",
" stdout.Display(q);",
"}",
"for(i=0; i<2; i++){ stdout.Display(v[i]); stdout.Display(n); }",
"for(i=0; i<v.size-1; i++){ prtQuote(v[i]); stdout.Display(c); stdout.Display(n); }",
"prtQuote(v[v.size-1]); stdout.Display(n);",
"stdout.Display(v[v.size-1]); stdout.Display(n);",
"for(i=2; i<v.size-1; i++){ stdout.Display(v[i]); stdout.Display(n); }",
"];"
];
define prtQuote(str) {
 local j,t,v;
 stdout.Display(q);
 for (j=0; j<str.size; j++) {
  t = str.Substring(j,1);
  if (t==q) { stdout.Display(s); }
  if (t==s) { stdout.Display(s); }
  stdout.Display(t);
 }
 stdout.Display(q);
}
for(i=0; i<2; i++){ stdout.Display(v[i]); stdout.Display(n); }
for(i=0; i<v.size-1; i++){ prtQuote(v[i]); stdout.Display(c); stdout.Display(n); }
prtQuote(v[v.size-1]); stdout.Display(n);
stdout.Display(v[v.size-1]); stdout.Display(n);
for(i=2; i<v.size-1; i++){ stdout.Display(v[i]); stdout.Display(n); }

Bob is a dynamic object-oriented language with syntax similar to C/C++, Java, and JavaScript. Bob was created by David Betz, a former technical editor for DDJ, and the author of XLisp and XScheme, among other languages.

quine$

=={{header|Brainfuck}}==

->+>+++>>+>++>+>+++>>+>++>>>+>+>+>++>+>>>>+++>+>>++>+>+++>>++>++>>+>>+>++>++>+>>>>+++>+>>>>++>++>>>>+>>++>+>+++>>>++>>++++++>>+>>++>
+>>>>+++>>+++++>>+>+++>>>++>>++>>+>>++>+>+++>>>++>>+++++++++++++>>+>>++>+>+++>+>+++>>>++>>++++>>+>>++>+>>>>+++>>+++++>>>>++>>>>+>+>+
+>>+++>+>>>>+++>+>>>>+++>+>>>>+++>>++>++>+>+++>+>++>++>>>>>>++>+>+++>>>>>+++>>>++>+>+++>+>+>++>>>>>>++>>>+>>>++>+>>>>+++>+>>>+>>++>+
>++++++++++++++++++>>>>+>+>>>+>>++>+>+++>>>++>>++++++++>>+>>++>+>>>>+++>>++++++>>>+>++>>+++>+>+>++>+>+++>>>>>+++>>>+>+>>++>+>+++>>>+
+>>++++++++>>+>>++>+>>>>+++>>++++>>+>+++>>>>>>++>+>+++>>+>++>>>>+>+>++>+>>>>+++>>+++>>>+[[->>+<<]<+]+++++[->+++++++++<]>.[+]>>
[<<+++++++[->+++++++++<]>-.------------------->-[-<.<+>>]<[+]<+>>>]<<<[-[-[-[>>+<++++++[->+++++<]]>++++++++++++++<]>+++<]++++++
[->+++++++<]>+<<<-[->>>++<<<]>[->>.<<]<<]

Burlesque

Using the official interpreter:


blsq ) "I'm a quine."
"I'm a quine."

Every string, every number, every block is a quine.

C

#include <stdio.h>

static char sym[] = "\n\t\\\"";

int main(void) {
	const char *code = "#include <stdio.h>%c%cstatic char sym[] = %c%cn%ct%c%c%c%c%c;%c%cint main(void) {%c%cconst char *code = %c%s%c;%c%cprintf(code, sym[0], sym[0], sym[3], sym[2], sym[2], sym[2], sym[2], sym[2], sym[3], sym[3], sym[0], sym[0], sym[0], sym[1], sym[3], code, sym[3], sym[0], sym[1], sym[0], sym[0], sym[1], sym[0], sym[0]);%c%c%creturn 0;%c}%c";
	printf(code, sym[0], sym[0], sym[3], sym[2], sym[2], sym[2], sym[2], sym[2], sym[3], sym[3], sym[0], sym[0], sym[0], sym[1], sym[3], code, sym[3], sym[0], sym[1], sym[0], sym[0], sym[1], sym[0], sym[0]);

	return 0;
}

Shorter version

#include <stdio.h>
int main(){char*c="#include <stdio.h>%cint main(){char*c=%c%s%c;printf(c,10,34,c,34,10);return 0;}%c";printf(c,10,34,c,34,10);return 0;}

C#

class Program { static void Main() { var s = "class Program {{ static void Main() {{ var s = {0}{1}{0}; System.Console.WriteLine(s, (char)34, s); }} }}"; System.Console.WriteLine(s, (char)34, s); } }

C++

#include <cstdio>

int main(){char n[]=R"(#include<cstdio>
int main(){char n[]=R"(%s%c";printf(n,n,41);})";printf(n,n,41);}

C1R

The C1R compiler usually copies C solutions from tasks at Rosetta Code. The Quine task is an exception; it gets special treatment in the C1R compiler.

Quine

Ceylon

shared void run() {print(let (x = """shared void run() {print(let (x = $) x.replaceFirst("$", "\"\"\"" + x + "\"\"\""));}""") x.replaceFirst("$", "\"\"\"" + x + "\"\"\""));}

Clojure

((fn [x] (list x (list (quote quote) x))) (quote (fn [x] (list x (list (quote quote) x)))))

A shorter but less interesting version:

(#(print (str "(#" % " '" % ")")) '(print (str "(#" % " '" % ")")))

COBOL

Here is one that works with GnuCOBOL, December 2015, by Simon Sobisch, tweaked by Bill Woodger.

One line, 150 characters. Some warnings regarding relaxed syntax assumptions when compiled with

cobc -x -free -frelax quine.cob

linkage section. 78 c value "display 'linkage section. 78 c value ' x'22' c x'222e20' c.". display 'linkage section. 78 c value ' x'22' c x'222e20' c.

The following two quines were in a gray past (around 2004?) posted to the (currently inaccessible) language forum of the [http://mvshelp.net/vbforums/ mvsHelp Boards]

       IDENTIFICATION DIVISION.
       PROGRAM-ID. GRICE.
       ENVIRONMENT DIVISION.
       CONFIGURATION SECTION.
       SPECIAL-NAMES.
           SYMBOLIC CHARACTERS FULL-STOP IS 76.
       INPUT-OUTPUT SECTION.
       FILE-CONTROL.
           SELECT OUTPUT-FILE ASSIGN TO OUTPUT1.
       DATA DIVISION.
       FILE SECTION.
       FD  OUTPUT-FILE
           RECORDING MODE F
           LABEL RECORDS OMITTED.
       01  OUTPUT-RECORD                     PIC X(80).
       WORKING-STORAGE SECTION.
       01  SUB-X                             PIC S9(4) COMP.
       01  SOURCE-FACSIMILE-AREA.
           02  SOURCE-FACSIMILE-DATA.
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       IDENTIFICATION DIVISION.         ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       PROGRAM-ID. GRICE.               ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       ENVIRONMENT DIVISION.            ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       CONFIGURATION SECTION.           ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       SPECIAL-NAMES.                   ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           SYMBOLIC CHARACTERS FULL-STOP".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               " IS 76.                                 ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       INPUT-OUTPUT SECTION.            ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       FILE-CONTROL.                    ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           SELECT OUTPUT-FILE ASSIGN TO ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "OUTPUT1.                                ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       DATA DIVISION.                   ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       FILE SECTION.                    ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       FD  OUTPUT-FILE                  ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           RECORDING MODE F             ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           LABEL RECORDS OMITTED.       ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       01  OUTPUT-RECORD                ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "     PIC X(80).                         ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       WORKING-STORAGE SECTION.         ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       01  SUB-X                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "     PIC S9(4) COMP.                    ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       01  SOURCE-FACSIMILE-AREA.       ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           02  SOURCE-FACSIMILE-DATA.   ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "               03  FILLER               ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "     PIC X(40) VALUE                    ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           02  SOURCE-FACSIMILE-TABLE RE".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "DEFINES                                 ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                   SOURCE-FACSIMILE-DATA".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               ".                                       ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "               03  SOURCE-FACSIMILE OCCU".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "RS 68.                                  ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                   04  SOURCE-FACSIMILE-".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "ONE  PIC X(40).                         ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                   04  SOURCE-FACSIMILE-".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "TWO  PIC X(40).                         ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       01  FILLER-IMAGE.                ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           02  FILLER                   ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "     PIC X(15) VALUE SPACES.            ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           02  FILLER                   ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "     PIC X     VALUE QUOTE.             ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           02  FILLER-DATA              ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "     PIC X(40).                         ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           02  FILLER                   ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "     PIC X     VALUE QUOTE.             ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           02  FILLER                   ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "     PIC X     VALUE FULL-STOP.         ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           02  FILLER                   ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "     PIC X(22) VALUE SPACES.            ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       PROCEDURE DIVISION.              ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       MAIN-LINE SECTION.               ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       ML-1.                            ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           OPEN OUTPUT OUTPUT-FILE.     ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           MOVE 1 TO SUB-X.             ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       ML-2.                            ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           MOVE SOURCE-FACSIMILE (SUB-X)".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               " TO OUTPUT-RECORD.                      ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           WRITE OUTPUT-RECORD.         ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           IF  SUB-X < 19               ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "               ADD 1 TO SUB-X           ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "               GO TO ML-2.              ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           MOVE 1 TO SUB-X.             ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       ML-3.                            ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           MOVE SOURCE-FACSIMILE (20) TO".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               " OUTPUT-RECORD.                         ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           WRITE OUTPUT-RECORD.         ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           MOVE SOURCE-FACSIMILE-ONE (SU".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "B-X) TO FILLER-DATA.                    ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           MOVE FILLER-IMAGE TO OUTPUT-R".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "ECORD.                                  ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           WRITE OUTPUT-RECORD.         ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           MOVE SOURCE-FACSIMILE (20) TO".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               " OUTPUT-RECORD.                         ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           WRITE OUTPUT-RECORD.         ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           MOVE SOURCE-FACSIMILE-TWO (SU".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "B-X) TO FILLER-DATA.                    ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           MOVE FILLER-IMAGE TO OUTPUT-R".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "ECORD.                                  ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           WRITE OUTPUT-RECORD.         ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           IF  SUB-X < 68               ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "               ADD 1 TO SUB-X           ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "               GO TO ML-3.              ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           MOVE 21 TO SUB-X.            ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       ML-4.                            ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           MOVE SOURCE-FACSIMILE (SUB-X)".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               " TO OUTPUT-RECORD.                      ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           WRITE OUTPUT-RECORD.         ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           IF  SUB-X < 68               ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "               ADD 1 TO SUB-X           ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "               GO TO ML-4.              ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "       ML-99.                           ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           CLOSE OUTPUT-FILE.           ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "           STOP RUN.                    ".
               03  FILLER                    PIC X(40) VALUE
               "                                        ".
           02  SOURCE-FACSIMILE-TABLE REDEFINES
                   SOURCE-FACSIMILE-DATA.
               03  SOURCE-FACSIMILE OCCURS 68.
                   04  SOURCE-FACSIMILE-ONE  PIC X(40).
                   04  SOURCE-FACSIMILE-TWO  PIC X(40).
       01  FILLER-IMAGE.
           02  FILLER                        PIC X(15) VALUE SPACES.
           02  FILLER                        PIC X     VALUE QUOTE.
           02  FILLER-DATA                   PIC X(40).
           02  FILLER                        PIC X     VALUE QUOTE.
           02  FILLER                        PIC X     VALUE FULL-STOP.
           02  FILLER                        PIC X(22) VALUE SPACES.
       PROCEDURE DIVISION.
       MAIN-LINE SECTION.
       ML-1.
           OPEN OUTPUT OUTPUT-FILE.
           MOVE 1 TO SUB-X.
       ML-2.
           MOVE SOURCE-FACSIMILE (SUB-X) TO OUTPUT-RECORD.
           WRITE OUTPUT-RECORD.
           IF  SUB-X < 19
               ADD 1 TO SUB-X
               GO TO ML-2.
           MOVE 1 TO SUB-X.
       ML-3.
           MOVE SOURCE-FACSIMILE (20) TO OUTPUT-RECORD.
           WRITE OUTPUT-RECORD.
           MOVE SOURCE-FACSIMILE-ONE (SUB-X) TO FILLER-DATA.
           MOVE FILLER-IMAGE TO OUTPUT-RECORD.
           WRITE OUTPUT-RECORD.
           MOVE SOURCE-FACSIMILE (20) TO OUTPUT-RECORD.
           WRITE OUTPUT-RECORD.
           MOVE SOURCE-FACSIMILE-TWO (SUB-X) TO FILLER-DATA.
           MOVE FILLER-IMAGE TO OUTPUT-RECORD.
           WRITE OUTPUT-RECORD.
           IF  SUB-X < 68
               ADD 1 TO SUB-X
               GO TO ML-3.
           MOVE 21 TO SUB-X.
       ML-4.
           MOVE SOURCE-FACSIMILE (SUB-X) TO OUTPUT-RECORD.
           WRITE OUTPUT-RECORD.
           IF  SUB-X < 68
               ADD 1 TO SUB-X
               GO TO ML-4.
       ML-99.
           CLOSE OUTPUT-FILE.
           STOP RUN.
       ID DIVISION.
       PROGRAM-ID. QUINE.
       DATA DIVISION.
       WORKING-STORAGE SECTION.
       1 X PIC S9(4) COMP.
       1 A. 2 B.
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "       ID DIVISION.                     ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "                                        ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "       PROGRAM-ID. QUINE.               ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "                                        ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "       DATA DIVISION.                   ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "                                        ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "       WORKING-STORAGE SECTION.         ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "                                        ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "       1 X PIC S9(4) COMP.              ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "                                        ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "       1 A. 2 B.                        ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "                                        ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "       2 T REDEFINES B. 3 TE OCCURS 16. ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "4 T1 PIC X(40). 4 T2 PIC X(40).         ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "       1 F. 2 PIC X(25)           VALUE ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "'       3 PIC X(40) VALUE '.            ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "       2 PIC X VALUE QUOTE. 2 FF PIC X(4".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "0). 2 PIC X VALUE QUOTE.                ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "       2 PIC X VALUE '.'.               ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "                                        ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "       PROCEDURE DIVISION.              ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "                                        ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "           PERFORM VARYING X FROM 1 BY 1".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE " UNTIL X > 6 DISPLAY TE (X)             ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "           END-PERFORM PERFORM VARYING X".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE " FROM 1 BY 1 UNTIL X > 16               ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "           MOVE T1 (X) TO FF DISPLAY F M".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "OVE T2 (X) TO FF DISPLAY F              ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "           END-PERFORM PERFORM VARYING X".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE " FROM 7 BY 1 UNTIL X > 16               ".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "           DISPLAY TE (X) END-PERFORM ST".
       3 PIC X(40) VALUE "OP RUN.                                 ".
       2 T REDEFINES B. 3 TE OCCURS 16. 4 T1 PIC X(40). 4 T2 PIC X(40).
       1 F. 2 PIC X(25)           VALUE '       3 PIC X(40) VALUE '.
       2 PIC X VALUE QUOTE. 2 FF PIC X(40). 2 PIC X VALUE QUOTE.
       2 PIC X VALUE '.'.
       PROCEDURE DIVISION.
           PERFORM VARYING X FROM 1 BY 1 UNTIL X > 6 DISPLAY TE (X)
           END-PERFORM PERFORM VARYING X FROM 1 BY 1 UNTIL X > 16
           MOVE T1 (X) TO FF DISPLAY F MOVE T2 (X) TO FF DISPLAY F
           END-PERFORM PERFORM VARYING X FROM 7 BY 1 UNTIL X > 16
           DISPLAY TE (X) END-PERFORM STOP RUN.

An even smaller one could be found of the site of [http://www.tmdg.co.uk/programing/quine.cbl.php Tom Dawes-Gamble], but is reproduced below, as the original seems to have vanished:


        Author. Tom Dawes-Gamble. (c) 2000
       01 src-lines pic x(768) value
       "        Author. Tom Dawes-Gamble. (c) 2000
      -"01 src-lines pic x(768) value
      -"01 sl redefines src-lines pic x(64) occurs 12 indexed by i.
      -"  Perform varying i from 1 by 1 until i > 2
      -"    Display '       ' sl(i).
      -"  Display '       ' quote sl(1).
      -"  Perform varying i from 2 by 1 until i > 11
      -"    Display '      ' '-' quote sl(i).
      -"  Display '      ' '-' quote '  Stop run.' quote '.'.
      -"  Perform varying i from 3 by 1 until i > 12
      -"    Display '       ' sl(i).
      -"  Stop run.".
       01 sl redefines src-lines pic x(64) occurs 12 indexed by i.
         Perform varying i from 1 by 1 until i > 2
           Display '       ' sl(i).
         Display '       ' quote sl(1).
         Perform varying i from 2 by 1 until i > 11
           Display '      ' '-' quote sl(i).
         Display '      ' '-' quote '  Stop run.' quote '.'.
         Perform varying i from 3 by 1 until i > 12
           Display '       ' sl(i).
         Stop run.

CoffeeScript

s="s=#&# ;alert s.replace(/&/,s).replace /#(?=[^&;'(]|';;$)/g, '#';;" ;alert s.replace(/&/,s).replace /#(?=[^&;'(]|';;$)/g, '"';;

Commodore BASIC

A rather long and unwieldy (although nicely formatted) BASIC quine that doesn't use the 10 LIST cheat. Works on the PET, VIC-20, C-64, C-128, C-16 and Plus/4, CBM-II, and CBM-5x0 series, and probably several non-Commodore BASICs as well, especially those based on Microsoft BASIC.

10 DATA 49,54,48,32,78,61,51,51,48,13,49,55,48,32,68,73,77,32,65,40,78,41,13
20 DATA 49,56,48,32,70,79,82,32,73,61,48,32,84,79,32,78,13,49,57,48,32,58,32
30 DATA 82,69,65,68,32,65,40,73,41,13,50,48,48,32,78,69,88,84,32,73,13,50,49
40 DATA 48,32,70,79,82,32,73,61,48,32,84,79,32,49,52,32,13,50,50,48,32,58,32
50 DATA 80,82,73,78,84,32,77,73,68,36,40,83,84,82,36,40,40,73,43,49,41,42,49
60 DATA 48,41,44,50,41,59,34,32,68,65,84,65,32,34,59,77,73,68,36,40,83,84,82
70 DATA 36,40,65,40,73,42,50,51,41,41,44,50,41,59,13,50,51,48,32,58,32,70,79
80 DATA 82,32,74,61,49,32,84,79,32,50,50,13,50,52,48,32,58,32,32,32,75,61,73
90 DATA 42,50,51,43,74,13,50,53,48,32,58,32,32,32,73,70,32,75,32,60,61,32,78
100 DATA 32,84,72,69,78,32,80,82,73,78,84,32,34,44,34,59,77,73,68,36,40,83,84
110 DATA 82,36,40,65,40,75,41,41,44,50,41,59,13,50,54,48,32,58,32,78,69,88,84
120 DATA 32,74,13,50,55,48,32,58,32,80,82,73,78,84,13,50,56,48,32,78,69,88,84
130 DATA 32,73,13,50,57,48,32,70,79,82,32,73,61,48,32,84,79,32,78,13,51,48,48
140 DATA 32,58,32,80,82,73,78,84,32,67,72,82,36,40,65,40,73,41,41,59,13,51,49
150 DATA 48,32,78,69,88,84,32,73,13
160 N=330
170 DIM A(N)
180 FOR I=0 TO N
190 : READ A(I)
200 NEXT I
210 FOR I=0 TO 14
220 : PRINT MID$(STR$((I+1)*10),2);" DATA ";MID$(STR$(A(I*23)),2);
230 : FOR J=1 TO 22
240 :   K=I*23+J
250 :   IF K <= N THEN PRINT ",";MID$(STR$(A(K)),2);
260 : NEXT J
270 : PRINT
280 NEXT I
290 FOR I=0 TO N
300 : PRINT CHR$(A(I));
310 NEXT I

Common Lisp

There are many simple ways to write a quine in Common Lisp, since source can be quoted and manipulated; this one defines an anonymous function, which is applied to its own source, which writes out that application of itself to its source. Note that Common Lisp by default does not distinguish cases.

((lambda (s) (print (list s (list 'quote s))))
 '(lambda (s) (print (list s (list 'quote s)))))

This one does the same thing using quasiquote (template) syntax; in some implementations it may not print nicely (but will still work):

((lambda (s) (print `(,s ',s))) '(lambda (s) (print `(,s ',s))))

or another version:

((lambda (x) `(,x ',x)) '(lambda (x) `(,x ',x)))

This program's source contains an explicit reference to itself, which it prints in a manner preserving that reference:

#1=(write '#1# :circle t)

or another version (the former version cause looping in SBCL 1.0.56):

#1=(progn (setq *print-circle* t) (write '#1#))

This is an example using format and explicit referencing:

(format t #1='"(format t #1='~s #1#)" #1#)

An example using [[REPL]] variables:

(write -)

D

This Quine outputs its own source both during compiling and running.

const auto s=`const auto q="const auto s=\x60"~s~"\x60;
mixin(s);";import std.stdio;void main(){writefln(q);pragma(msg,q);}`;
mixin(s);

''NB:'' last line should be CRLF to match pragma's newline output behaviour.

Dao

Dao's BNF-like meta-programming macro supports quoting expressions as strings, which allow writing a quine as the following:

syntax{Q $EXP}as{io.writef('syntax{Q $EXP}as{%s}Q %s',\'$EXP\',\'$EXP\')}Q io.writef('syntax{Q $EXP}as{%s}Q %s',\'$EXP\',\'$EXP\')

dc

[91PP93P[dx]P]dx

=={{header|Déjà Vu}}==

"!print !. dup"
!print !. dup

E

" =~ x; println(E.toQuote(x),x)" =~ x; println(E.toQuote(x),x)

Elixir

a = <<"a = ~p~n:io.fwrite(a,[a])~n">>
:io.fwrite(a,[a])

Erlang


-module(quine).
-export([do/0]).

do() -> Txt=txt(), io:format("~s~ntxt() ->~n~w.~n",[Txt,Txt]), halt().
txt() ->
[45,109,111,100,117,108,101,40,113,117,105,110,101,41,46,10,45,101,120,112,111,114,116,40,91,100,111,47,48,93,41,46,10,10,100,111,40,41,32,45,62,32,84,120,116,61,116,120,116,40,41,44,32,105,111,58,102,111,114,109,97,116,40,34,126,115,126,110,116,120,116,40,41,32,45,62,126,110,126,119,46,126,110,34,44,91,84,120,116,44,84,120,116,93,41,44,32,104,97,108,116,40,41,46].


ERRE

PROGRAM QUINE
BEGIN
READ(D$,Y$)
LOOP
    READ(X$)
    EXIT IF LEN(X$)<1
    PRINT(X$)
END LOOP
RESTORE
LOOP
    READ(X$)
    EXIT IF LEN(X$)<1
    PRINT(D$;CHR$(34);X$;CHR$(34);CHR$(41))
END LOOP
PRINT(D$;CHR$(34);CHR$(34);CHR$(41))
PRINT(Y$)
DATA("DATA(")
DATA("END PROGRAM")
DATA("PROGRAM QUINE")
DATA("BEGIN")
DATA("READ(D$,Y$)")
DATA("LOOP")
DATA("    READ(X$)")
DATA("    EXIT IF LEN(X$)<1")
DATA("    PRINT(X$)")
DATA("END LOOP")
DATA("RESTORE")
DATA("LOOP")
DATA("    READ(X$)")
DATA("    EXIT IF LEN(X$)<1")
DATA("    PRINT(D$;CHR$(34);X$;CHR$(34);CHR$(41))")
DATA("END LOOP")
DATA("PRINT(D$;CHR$(34);CHR$(34);CHR$(41))")
DATA("PRINT(Y$)")
DATA("")
END PROGRAM

Euphoria

{{trans|C}}

constant p="constant p=%s%s%s printf(1,p,{34,p,34})" printf(1,p,{34,p,34})

=={{header|F Sharp|F#}}== Using .NET string formatting

let s = "let s = {0}{1}{0} in System.Console.WriteLine(s, char 34, s);;" in System.Console.WriteLine(s, char 34, s);;

Using Printf library

(fun s c -> printf s c s.Value c) "(fun s c -> printf s c s.Value c) %c%s%c <| char 34;;" <| char 34;;

Factor

With printf:

"%s [ 34 1string dup surround ] keep printf" [ 34 1string dup surround ] keep printf

With prettyprinter:

"[ pprint ] [ write ] bi"[ pprint ] [ write ] bi

Fish

All the zeros and +'s on the first line are just for aesthetic purposes. Only two zeros are needed, although the v at the end must line up.

 00000000000000000000++++++++++++++++++ v
2[$:{:@]$g:0=?v    >o:4a*=?!v~1+:3=?;0ao>
              >~" "^        >1+         ^

=={{header|Fōrmulæ}}==

In [http://wiki.formulae.org/Quine this] page you can see the solution of this task.

Fōrmulæ programs are not textual, visualization/edition of programs is done showing/manipulating structures but not text ([http://wiki.formulae.org/Editing_F%C5%8Drmul%C3%A6_expressions more info]). Moreover, there can be multiple visual representations of the same program. Even though it is possible to have textual representation —i.e. XML, JSON— they are intended for transportation effects more than visualization and edition.

The option to show Fōrmulæ programs and their results is showing images. Unfortunately images cannot be uploaded in Rosetta Code.

Forth

A large number of quine methods are listed [http://www.complang.tuwien.ac.at/forth/quines.html here], the simplest of which is:




## Fortran


### F90+

Fortran allows the start of a text literal to be marked by either an apostrophe or a double quote and the end by the corresponding character. Doubling is used to signify that the delimiter appears within a literal.

```fortran
character*46::s='("character*46::s=",3a,";print s,39,s,39;end")';print s,39,s,39;end

{{out}}


character*46::s='("character*46::s=",3a,";print s,39,s,39;end")';print s,39,s,39;end

In ASCII, character 39 is an apostrophe. When run, the last "print" is preceded by three spaces after the semicolon that do not appear in the source. This wouldn't worry a Fortran compiler, because spaces are ignored outside text literals. More troublesome is that the first letter of the output appears in column one, and, being the letter "c", that marks a comment. This is why the text lighlighting has rendered the source text in italic. Later Fortran compilers may disregard this comment formalism in favour of the now standard in-line comment starter of an exclamation mark, and for them, the source would not be a comment.

Older Fortran

This reverts to fixed-format source form, relying on the format code / to signify a new line so that ASCII control characters need not be represented. Code T''n'' means "tab" to column ''n'' - no ASCII tab characters are involved. And difficulty with quoted strings is avoided by using the Hollerith form, ''n''H, signifying that ''n'' characters follow the H as a text literal.

      WRITE(6,100)
      STOP
  100 FORMAT(6X,12HWRITE(6,100)/6X,4HSTOP/
     .42H  100 FORMAT(6X,12HWRITE(6,100)/6X,4HSTOP/          ,2(/5X,67H.
     .42H  100 FORMAT(6X,12HWRITE(6,100)/6X,4HSTOP/          ,2(/5X,67H.
     .)/T48,2H)/T1,5X2(21H.)/T48,2H)/T1,5X2(21H)/
     .T62,10H)/6X3HEND)T1,5X2(28H.T62,10H)/6X3HEND)T1,5X2(28H)/6X3HEND)
      END

And indeed, exactly that opaque gibberish is written, with leading spaces to column seven and full stops in column six to mark a continuation. This was checked by UltraCompare, not just by eye!

Nostalgia note

I remember when this challenge came up, way back in 1966 --- FORTRAN was the game in town, and there existed a feature (well, really, a bug) that allowed an IBM FORTRAN program under IBM's OS/PCP/MFT/MVT [no HASP] to '''REWIND''' the default input stream (which were punched cards, and ''REWIND'' of course, was only intended for reel-to-reel tapes), which essentially then allowed the program to read it's own source, and then it was a simple matter to PRINT it.

The current CONTROL DATA FORTRAN had a feature that allowed the FORTRAN programmer to WRITE and then re-read I/O (the feature could've been called the REREAD statement, the WRITE may have been to device 0). If one didn't WRITE, just REREAD, the file stream then pointed to the source just read, thus allowing access to the FORTRAN program's source.

This challenge was extended to other languages, the concept was to print the actual source of the program, not use a recursive (or some derivative) method. There were some very clever (and obtuse and/or obscure) methods presented. A lot of operating systems, being in their infancy, had loopholes that allowed programmers to access files in their own job stream.

Another challenge at that time was to write a multi-language program (with NO changes) that would compile (or assemble) in various languages (without errors, of course) and produce the identical output. There were some very creative uses of "comments". --- Gerard Schildberger.

Free Pascal

const s=';begin writeln(#99#111#110#115#116#32#115#61#39,s,#39,s);readln;end.';begin writeln(#99#111#110#115#116#32#115#61#39,s,#39,s);readln;end.

FreeBASIC

===Código 1:===


#Define P(X) Print X: Print "P(" & #X & ")"
P("#Define P(X) Print X: Print ""P("" & #X & "")""")

===Código 2:===


Dim As String s = "Dim As String s = : Print Left(s, 18) + Chr(34) + s + Chr(34) + Mid(s, 18)" : Print Left(s, 18) + Chr(34) + s + Chr(34) + Mid(s, 18)

Frink

This is not a particularly clever nor concise quine, but it is indeed a quine.

d="633d636861725b33345d3b653d643b7072696e745b22643d2463246424635c6e222b28653d7e25732f285b612d7a302d395d7b327d292f636861725b7061727365496e745b24312c31365d5d2f6567295d"
c=char[34];e=d;print["d=$c$d$c\n"+(e=~%s/([a-z0-9]{2})/char[parseInt[$1,16]]/eg)]

A more concise quine is:




## GAP


```gap
f:=function (  )
    Print( "f:=", f, ";;\nf();\n" );
    return;
end;;
f();

Gema

*=$1@quote{$1}\}\n@abort;@{\*\=\$1\@quote\{\$1\}\\\}\\n\@abort\;\@\{}

Go

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
	a := "package main\n\nimport \"fmt\"\n\nfunc main() {\n\ta := %q\n\tfmt.Printf(a, a)\n}\n"
	fmt.Printf(a, a)
}

Groovy

There are several ways to do this. Here are five:

s="s=%s;printf s,s.inspect()";printf s,s.inspect()
evaluate s='char q=39;print"evaluate s=$q$s$q"'
s="s=%c%s%c;printf s,34,s,34";printf s,34,s,34
s='s=%c%s%1$c;printf s,39,s';printf s,39,s
printf _='printf _=%c%s%1$c,39,_',39,_

Also Groovy has a trivial solution of an empty (0 length) file even though that isn't an allowable solution here.

=={{header|GW-BASIC}}==




## Haskell

(Haskell does not provide access to a source-code equivalent representation of the code at runtime.)

In Haskell, function arguments are not surrounded by parentheses, which permits a simple quine where there is only the unquoted code followed by the quoted code.

```haskell
let q s = putStrLn (s ++ show s) in q "let q s = putStrLn (s ++ show s) in q "

It is also possible to eliminate one or both of the variables (point-free style): the let can be replaced with a lambda. (. is function composition.)

(\s -> putStrLn (s ++ show s)) "(\\s -> putStrLn (s ++ show s)) "
(putStrLn . \s -> s ++ show s) "(putStrLn . \\s -> s ++ show s) "

and s can be replaced by ap, which when applied to functions has the effect of the [[wp:SKI combinator calculus|S combinator]]:

import Control.Monad.Reader
(putStrLn . ap (++) show) "(putStrLn . ap (++) show) "

Since Haskell is a purely functional language, it is better at evaluating to things than printing them out. The following expression evaluates to a string of itself:

ap(++)show"ap(++)show"

Finally, here is a standalone program (the preceding examples only work in the REPL):

main = putStrLn $ (++) <*> show $ "main = putStrLn $ (++) <*> show $ "

Hoon

Unfortunately, this is quite a long quine due to the pretty-printing that is employeed. A majority of the code is fixing up the printed result of the array so it can be ran directly.

!:  :-  %say  |=  [^ [~ ~]]  =+  ^=  s  ((list ,@tas) ~['!:  :-  %say  |=  [^ [~ ~]]  =+  ^=  s  ((list ,@tas) ~[' 'x' '])  :-  %noun  (,tape (turn s |=(a=@tas ?:(=(a %x) (crip `(list ,@tas)`(turn s |=(b=@tas =+([s=?:(=(b %x) " " "") m=(trip ~~~27.)] (crip :(welp s m (trip b) m s)))))) a))))'])  :-  %noun  (,tape (turn s |=(a=@tas ?:(=(a %x) (crip `(list ,@tas)`(turn s |=(b=@tas =+([s=?:(=(b %x) " " "") m=(trip ~~~27.)] (crip :(welp s m (trip b) m s)))))) a))))

Two much shorter quines were created and tweeted from the @urbit_ twitter account, which might be more interesting:

=-(`@t`(rap 3 - (scot %uw -) ")") 0wwai8F.8y0Fb.i1Tti.kwt6Z.zsOww.bi0P8.71xsy.xwt41.wa2QZ)

[https://twitter.com/urbit_/status/651127726670147584 1]

=<(`_""`~[. `@`39 . `@`10.535] '=<(`_""`~[. `@`39 . `@`10.535] ')

[https://twitter.com/urbit_/status/651126581499314176 2]

HQ9+

Any program with a single “Q” is a quine. The simplest possible such program is just this:



=={{header|HTML}} + CSS==
{{works with|Opera|10.0}} <!-- At the very least, guaranteed to work with these -->
{{works with|Firefox|3.5}}

This solution uses CSS to print out the source itself, e.g. the "direct accessing" method. Doesn't work in Internet Explorer; try it in one of Opera, Firefox, Safari, Chromium etc.

```css
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
	<title>HTML/CSS Quine</title>
	<style type="text/css">
	* { font: 10pt monospace; }

	head, style { display: block; }
	style { white-space: pre; }

	style:before {
		content:
			"\3C""!DOCTYPE html\3E"
			"\A\3Chtml\3E\A"
			"\3Chead\3E\A"
			"\9\3Ctitle\3E""HTML/CSS Quine""\3C/title\3E\A"
			"\9\3Cstyle type=\22text/css\22\3E";
	}
	style:after {
		content:
			"\3C/style\3E\A"
			"\3C/head\3E\A"
			"\3C""body\3E\3C/body\3E\A"
			"\3C/html\3E";
	}
	</style>
</head>
<body></body>
</html>

Huginn

#! /bin/sh
exec huginn --no-argv -E "${0}"
#! huginn

main() {
	c = "#! /bin/sh{1}~"
		"exec huginn --no-argv -E {3}${{0}}{3}{1}#! huginn{1}{1}~"
		"main() {{{1}{2}c = {3}{0}{3};{1}{2}print({1}~"
		"{2}{2}copy( c ).replace( {3}{5}{3}, {3}{3} )~"
		".format({1}{2}{2}{2}c.replace( {3}{5}{3}, ~"
		"{3}{5}{4}{3}{4}n{4}t{4}t{4}{3}{3} ), ~"
		"{3}{4}n{3}, {3}{4}t{3}, {3}{4}{3}{3}, {3}{4}{4}{3}, ~"
		"{3}{5}{3}{1}{2}{2}){1}{2});{1}}}{1}{1}";
	print(
		copy( c ).replace( "~", "" ).format(
			c.replace( "~", "~\"\n\t\t\"" ), "\n", "\t", "\"", "\\", "~"
		)
	);
}

=={{header|Icon}} and {{header|Unicon}}==

procedure main();x:="write(\"procedure main();x:=\",image(x));write(x);end"
write("procedure main();x:=",image(x));write(x);end

Io




## Inform 7


```inform7
R is a room. To quit: (- quit; -). When play begins: say entry 1 in Q; say Q in brace notation; quit. Q is a list of text variable. Q is {"R is a room. To quit: (- quit; -). When play begins: say entry 1 in Q; say Q in brace notation; quit. Q is a list of text variable. Q is "}

J

Technically, the empty program in J is a quine, as it has an empty result. For example:



Also, many many numbers in J are quines. For example (result not shown, here, for clarity):



Note: this implementation assumes that J is being used interactively.  If J is being used in a command line script, having the script read and output itself would be a better approach. And it's not clear whether quines are a relevant concept in a none textual context (such as a windowing environment).

And other [[j:Puzzles/Quine#Solutions|solutions]] are also possible.


## Java

Copied from [http://www.nyx.net/~gthompso/copyrights.htm The Quine Page]

Author: Bertram Felgenhauer
<div style="width:100%;overflow:scroll">

```java
class S{public static void main(String[]a){String s="class S{public static void main(String[]a){String s=;char c=34;System.out.println(s.substring(0,52)+c+s+c+s.substring(52));}}";char c=34;System.out.println(s.substring(0,52)+c+s+c+s.substring(52));}}

{{works with|Java|1.5+}}

class S{public static void main(String[]a){String p="class S{public static void main(String[]a){String p=%c%s%1$c;System.out.printf(p,34,p);}}";System.out.printf(p,34,p);}}

JavaScript

{{works with|SpiderMonkey}} 1.7.0

(function(){print("("+arguments.callee.toString().replace(/\s/g,'')+")()");})()

Using eval

{{works with|SpiderMonkey}} 1.7.0 This version doesn't use arguments.callee.toString() to return the string representation of itself. Instead, it relies on eval().

var code='var q=String.fromCharCode(39);print("var code="+q+code+q+";eval(code)")';eval(code)

Replacing String

(function(){str=["(function(){str=[F].join(String.fromCharCode(34));str=str.replace(/F/,String.fromCharCode(34)+str+String.fromCharCode(34));console.log(str)})()"].join(String.fromCharCode(34));str=str.replace(/F/,String.fromCharCode(34)+str+String.fromCharCode(34));console.log(str)})()

Code As Data

q=`%3Bconsole.log(%60q%3D%5C%60%24%7Bq%7D%5C%60%60%2BdecodeURIComponent(q))`;console.log(`q=\`${q}\``+decodeURIComponent(q))

Another Method

var a=function () {var b="var a="+a.toString()+"\;a()";alert(b)};a()

A simple module which simply evaluates to itself

(function f() {

    return '(' + f.toString() + ')();';

})();

{{Out}}

(function f() {

    return '(' + f.toString() + ')();';

})();

Or logs itself to the console

(function f() {

    console.log('(' + f.toString() + ')();');

})();

{{Out}}

(function f() {

    console.log('(' + f.toString() + ')();');

})();

Joy

"dup put putchars 10 putch." dup put putchars 10 putch.

Jsish

Based on Javascript eval solution.

var code='var q=String.fromCharCode(39);puts("var code="+q+code+q+";eval(code)")';eval(code)

{{out}} Double test, run quine.jsi output through the jsish argument evaluator:

prompt$ jsish -e "$(jsish quine.jsi)"
var code='var q=String.fromCharCode(39);puts("var code="+q+code+q+";eval(code)")';eval(code)

Julia


x="println(\"x=\$(repr(x))\\n\$x\")"
println("x=$(repr(x))\n$x")

In Julia, $x in a string literal interpolates the value of the variable into the string. $(expression) evaluates the expression and interpolates the result into the string. Normally, the string value "hi\tworld" would be inserted without quotation marks and with a literal tab. The repr function returns a string value that contains quotation marks and in which the literal tab is replaced by the characters \t. When the result of the repr function is interpolated, the result is what you would type into your code to create that string literal.

Kotlin

The following is based on the classic C quine but makes use of Kotlin's 'raw' (i.e. triple quoted) string literals.

// version 1.1.2

const val F = """// version 1.1.2

const val F = %c%c%c%s%c%c%c

fun main(args: Array<String>) {
    System.out.printf(F, 34, 34, 34, F, 34, 34, 34)
}
"""

fun main(args: Array<String>) {
    System.out.printf(F, 34, 34, 34, F, 34, 34, 34)
}

Lasso

In template mode, any text that doesn't include Lasso tags is a trivial quine, because it is passed through unmodified by the interpreter. But here is a more traditional quine:

var(a=(:10,39,118,97,114,40,97,61,40,58,39,10,36,97,45,62,106,111,105,110,40,39,44,39,41,10,39,41,41,39,10,118,97,114,40,98,61,98,121,116,101,115,41,10,36,97,45,62,102,111,114,101,97,99,104,32,61,62,32,123,32,36,98,45,62,105,109,112,111,114,116,56,98,105,116,115,40,35,49,41,32,125,10,36,98,45,62,97,115,83,116,114,105,110,103))
'var(a=(:'
$a->join(',')
'))'
var(b=bytes)
$a->foreach => { $b->import8bits(#1) }
$b->asString

LDPL


DATA:
  A IS NUMBER VECTOR
  C IS TEXT
  N IS NUMBER
  I IS NUMBER
  J IS NUMBER
PROCEDURE:

  SUB-PROCEDURE SHOWU
    STORE 0 IN I
    WHILE I IS LESS THAN N DO
        DISPLAY "  STORE "
        DISPLAY A:I
        DISPLAY " IN "
        DISPLAY " A:"
        DISPLAY I CRLF
        ADD I AND 1 IN I
    REPEAT
    DISPLAY "  STORE "
    DISPLAY N
    DISPLAY " IN N" CRLF
  END SUB-PROCEDURE

  SUB-PROCEDURE SHOW
    STORE 0 IN J
    WHILE J IS LESS THAN N DO
        IF A:J IS EQUAL TO 42 THEN
          CALL SUB-PROCEDURE SHOWU
        ELSE
          STORE CHARACTER A:J IN C
          DISPLAY C
        END-IF
        ADD J AND 1 IN J
    REPEAT
  END SUB-PROCEDURE

  STORE 10 IN  A:0
  STORE 68 IN  A:1
  STORE 65 IN  A:2
  STORE 84 IN  A:3
  STORE 65 IN  A:4
  STORE 58 IN  A:5
  STORE 10 IN  A:6
  STORE 32 IN  A:7
  STORE 32 IN  A:8
  STORE 65 IN  A:9
  STORE 32 IN  A:10
  STORE 73 IN  A:11
  STORE 83 IN  A:12
  STORE 32 IN  A:13
  STORE 78 IN  A:14
  STORE 85 IN  A:15
  STORE 77 IN  A:16
  STORE 66 IN  A:17
  STORE 69 IN  A:18
  STORE 82 IN  A:19
  STORE 32 IN  A:20
  STORE 86 IN  A:21
  STORE 69 IN  A:22
  STORE 67 IN  A:23
  STORE 84 IN  A:24
  STORE 79 IN  A:25
  STORE 82 IN  A:26
  STORE 10 IN  A:27
  STORE 32 IN  A:28
  STORE 32 IN  A:29
  STORE 67 IN  A:30
  STORE 32 IN  A:31
  STORE 73 IN  A:32
  STORE 83 IN  A:33
  STORE 32 IN  A:34
  STORE 84 IN  A:35
  STORE 69 IN  A:36
  STORE 88 IN  A:37
  STORE 84 IN  A:38
  STORE 10 IN  A:39
  STORE 32 IN  A:40
  STORE 32 IN  A:41
  STORE 78 IN  A:42
  STORE 32 IN  A:43
  STORE 73 IN  A:44
  STORE 83 IN  A:45
  STORE 32 IN  A:46
  STORE 78 IN  A:47
  STORE 85 IN  A:48
  STORE 77 IN  A:49
  STORE 66 IN  A:50
  STORE 69 IN  A:51
  STORE 82 IN  A:52
  STORE 10 IN  A:53
  STORE 32 IN  A:54
  STORE 32 IN  A:55
  STORE 73 IN  A:56
  STORE 32 IN  A:57
  STORE 73 IN  A:58
  STORE 83 IN  A:59
  STORE 32 IN  A:60
  STORE 78 IN  A:61
  STORE 85 IN  A:62
  STORE 77 IN  A:63
  STORE 66 IN  A:64
  STORE 69 IN  A:65
  STORE 82 IN  A:66
  STORE 10 IN  A:67
  STORE 32 IN  A:68
  STORE 32 IN  A:69
  STORE 74 IN  A:70
  STORE 32 IN  A:71
  STORE 73 IN  A:72
  STORE 83 IN  A:73
  STORE 32 IN  A:74
  STORE 78 IN  A:75
  STORE 85 IN  A:76
  STORE 77 IN  A:77
  STORE 66 IN  A:78
  STORE 69 IN  A:79
  STORE 82 IN  A:80
  STORE 10 IN  A:81
  STORE 80 IN  A:82
  STORE 82 IN  A:83
  STORE 79 IN  A:84
  STORE 67 IN  A:85
  STORE 69 IN  A:86
  STORE 68 IN  A:87
  STORE 85 IN  A:88
  STORE 82 IN  A:89
  STORE 69 IN  A:90
  STORE 58 IN  A:91
  STORE 10 IN  A:92
  STORE 10 IN  A:93
  STORE 32 IN  A:94
  STORE 32 IN  A:95
  STORE 83 IN  A:96
  STORE 85 IN  A:97
  STORE 66 IN  A:98
  STORE 45 IN  A:99
  STORE 80 IN  A:100
  STORE 82 IN  A:101
  STORE 79 IN  A:102
  STORE 67 IN  A:103
  STORE 69 IN  A:104
  STORE 68 IN  A:105
  STORE 85 IN  A:106
  STORE 82 IN  A:107
  STORE 69 IN  A:108
  STORE 32 IN  A:109
  STORE 83 IN  A:110
  STORE 72 IN  A:111
  STORE 79 IN  A:112
  STORE 87 IN  A:113
  STORE 85 IN  A:114
  STORE 10 IN  A:115
  STORE 32 IN  A:116
  STORE 32 IN  A:117
  STORE 32 IN  A:118
  STORE 32 IN  A:119
  STORE 83 IN  A:120
  STORE 84 IN  A:121
  STORE 79 IN  A:122
  STORE 82 IN  A:123
  STORE 69 IN  A:124
  STORE 32 IN  A:125
  STORE 48 IN  A:126
  STORE 32 IN  A:127
  STORE 73 IN  A:128
  STORE 78 IN  A:129
  STORE 32 IN  A:130
  STORE 73 IN  A:131
  STORE 10 IN  A:132
  STORE 32 IN  A:133
  STORE 32 IN  A:134
  STORE 32 IN  A:135
  STORE 32 IN  A:136
  STORE 87 IN  A:137
  STORE 72 IN  A:138
  STORE 73 IN  A:139
  STORE 76 IN  A:140
  STORE 69 IN  A:141
  STORE 32 IN  A:142
  STORE 73 IN  A:143
  STORE 32 IN  A:144
  STORE 73 IN  A:145
  STORE 83 IN  A:146
  STORE 32 IN  A:147
  STORE 76 IN  A:148
  STORE 69 IN  A:149
  STORE 83 IN  A:150
  STORE 83 IN  A:151
  STORE 32 IN  A:152
  STORE 84 IN  A:153
  STORE 72 IN  A:154
  STORE 65 IN  A:155
  STORE 78 IN  A:156
  STORE 32 IN  A:157
  STORE 78 IN  A:158
  STORE 32 IN  A:159
  STORE 68 IN  A:160
  STORE 79 IN  A:161
  STORE 10 IN  A:162
  STORE 32 IN  A:163
  STORE 32 IN  A:164
  STORE 32 IN  A:165
  STORE 32 IN  A:166
  STORE 32 IN  A:167
  STORE 32 IN  A:168
  STORE 32 IN  A:169
  STORE 32 IN  A:170
  STORE 68 IN  A:171
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  STORE 704 IN N

  CALL SUB-PROCEDURE SHOW

Liberty BASIC

s$ = "s$ = : Print Left$(s$, 5) + chr$(34) + s$ + chr$(34) + Mid$(s$, 5)" : Print Left$(s$, 5) + chr$(34) + s$ + chr$(34) + Mid$(s$, 5)

LIL

LIL is a library with lil, an interactive shell. In the interactive shell


# reflect this
reflect this

Source from a file read from lil when the shell is invoked ''gets a little trickier''. The interactive shell wraps code read from files which changes '''this'''. So, as a testament to ease of embedding, here's a new non-interactive LIL one liner shell so we can '''write [reflect this]'''.

/*
   One line of LIL, given as argv[1]
   Tectonics: gcc -o lilone lilone.c lil.c -lm
      ./lilone 'print [reflect this]'
*/
#include <stdio.h>
#include "lil.h"
int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    lil_t lil = lil_new();
    lil_value_t result = lil_parse(lil, argv[1], 0, 1);

    const char *show = lil_to_string(result);
    if (show && show[0]) printf("%s\n", show);

    lil_free_value(result);
    lil_free(lil);
    return 0;
}

{{out}}

prompt$ gcc -o lilone lilone.c lil.c -lm
prompt$ ./lilone 'print [reflect this]'
print [reflect this]
prompt$

More attractive in the capture, the above is not quite right when it comes to newlines. So, the better answer would be:


prompt$ ./lilone 'write [reflect this]'
write [reflect this]prompt$

As an extra evaluation trial, command substitution from lilone, back into lilone:

prompt$ ./lilone "$(./lilone 'write [reflect this]')"
write [reflect this]prompt$

To avoid illusions of cheating in lilone.

prompt$ ./lilone 'expr 6 * 7'
42

Use '''print [reflect this]''' if the input source ends in a newline or just '''write [reflect this]'''.

Turns out the kernel of this quine can also be used with carefully selected surrounding code:

./lilone 'set something; write [reflect this]; write $something'
set something; write [reflect this]; write $something

as one example

Lisp

Lisp has a mechanism to ''quote'' code without the need to use strings:

((lambda (x) (list x (list 'quote x)))
  '(lambda (x) (list x (list 'quote x))))

Somewhat brute-force..

make "a [ 116 121 112 101 32 34 124 109 97 107 101 32 34 97 32 91 124 10 102 111 114 101 97 99 104 32 58 97 32 91 32 116 121 112 101 32 119 111 114 100 32 34 124 32 124 32 63 32 93 10 112 114 105 110 116 32 34 124 32 93 124 10 102 111 114 101 97 99 104 32 58 97 32 91 32 116 121 112 101 32 99 104 97 114 32 63 32 93 10 98 121 101 10 ]
type "|make "a [|
foreach :a [ type word "| | ? ]
print "| ]|
foreach :a [ type char ? ]
bye

Lua

s=[[io.write('s=[','[',s,']','];',s)]];io.write('s=[','[',s,']','];',s)

M4

define(`quine',``$1(`$1')'')dnl
quine(`define(`quine',``$1(`$1')'')dnl
quine')

Mathematica

a="Print[\"a=\",InputForm[a],\";\",a]";Print["a=",InputForm[a],";",a]

or

a := Print[InputForm[Definition[a]], ";a"];a

or

(#1[#0[#1]] &)[Defer]

or

ToString[#0][] & []

or

Unevaluated[1989 - 1989]

or

 :)

=={{header|MATLAB}} / {{header|Octave}}==
This script runs either from an m-file or directly from workspace (author: J. C. Lucero):

```Matlab
x='{>\(y>(((-y-(((<(^<ejtq)\{-y.2^*<';z=['x=''',x,''';'];disp([z,x-1]);

The example works for functions and scripts stored as m-files. It does not work for functions defined only in the workspace.

  function quine()
    fid = fopen([mfilename,'.m']);
    while ~feof(fid)
      printf('%s\n',fgetl(fid));
    end;
    fclose(fid);
  end;

or

  function quine()
    type(mfilename);
  end;

Without accessing the file:

function quine; y = 'function quine; y = %c%s%c; fprintf(1, y, 39, y, 39)\n'; fprintf(1, y, 39, y, 39)

Maxima

/* Using ?format from the unerlying Lisp system */

lambda([],block([q:ascii(34),s:"lambda([],block([q:ascii(34),s:~A~A~A],print(?format(false,s,q,s,q))))()$"],print(?format(false,s,q,s,q))))()$

=={{header|Modula-2}}==

MODULE Quine;
FROM FormatString IMPORT FormatString;
FROM Terminal IMPORT WriteString,ReadChar;

CONST src = "MODULE Quine;\nFROM FormatString IMPORT FormatString;\nFROM Terminal IMPORT WriteString,ReadChar;\n\nCONST src = \x022%s\x022;\nVAR buf : ARRAY[0..2048] OF CHAR;\nBEGIN\n    FormatString(src, buf, src);\n    WriteString(buf);\n    ReadChar\nEND Quine.\n";
VAR buf : ARRAY[0..2048] OF CHAR;
BEGIN
    FormatString(src, buf, src);
    WriteString(buf);
    ReadChar
END Quine.

MUMPS

QUINE
 NEW I,L SET I=0
 FOR  SET I=I+1,L=$TEXT(+I) Q:L=""  WRITE $TEXT(+I),!
 KILL I,L
 QUIT

SMALL
 S %=0 F  W $T(+$I(%)),! Q:$T(+%)=""

Both of the routines will work, but the second has the minor advantage of only using one variable instead of two.

NASM

Compiles to the source code when -f raw

%define a "%define "
%define b "db "
%define c "%deftok "
%define d "a, 97, 32, 34, a, 34, 10, a, 98, 32, 34, b, 34, 10, a, 99, 32, 34, c, 34, 10, a, 100, 32, 34, d, 34, 10, c, 101, 32, 100, 10, b, 101, 10"
%deftok e d
db e

NetRexx

/* NetRexx */
options replace format comments java crossref savelog symbols nobinary

Q = "'"
S = "\\"
N = "\n"
A = "&"
code = [ -
  '/* NetRexx */', -
  'options replace format comments java crossref savelog symbols nobinary', -
  '', -
  'Q = "&QS"', -
  'S = "&ESC"', -
  'N = "&NL"', -
  'A = "&AMP"', -
  'code = [ -', -
  '&REP', -
  '  ]', -
  '', -
  'pgm = ""', -
  'txt = ""', -
  'loop t_ = 0 for code.length', -
  '  txt = txt || "  " || Q || code[t_] || Q || ", -" || N', -
  '  end t_', -
  'txt = txt.strip("T", N)', -
  'txt = txt.delstr(txt.lastpos(","), 1)', -
  '', -
  'K = ""', -
  'K[0] = 5', -
  'K[1] = A"NL"', -
  'K[2] = A"AMP"', -
  'K[3] = A"ESC"', -
  'K[4] = A"QS"', -
  'K[5] = A"REP"', -
  'loop c_ = 0 for code.length', -
  '  loop v_ = 1 to K[0]', -
  '    T = K[v_]', -
  '    if code[c_].pos(T) <> 0 then do', -
  '      parse code[c_] pre(T)post', -
  '      select case T', -
  '        when K[1] then do', -
  '          code[c_] = pre || S || "n" || post', -
  '          end', -
  '        when K[2] then do', -
  '          code[c_] = pre || A || post', -
  '          end', -
  '        when K[3] then do', -
  '          code[c_] = pre || S || S || post', -
  '          end', -
  '        when K[4] then do', -
  '          code[c_] = pre || Q || post', -
  '          end', -
  '        when K[5] then do', -
  '          code[c_] = txt', -
  '          end', -
  '        otherwise nop', -
  '        end', -
  '      end', -
  '    end v_', -
  '  pgm = pgm || code[c_].strip("T") || N', -
  '  end c_', -
  'pgm = pgm.strip("T", N) || N', -
  'say pgm', -
  '', -
  'return', -
  '' -
  ]

pgm = ""
txt = ""
loop t_ = 0 for code.length
  txt = txt || "  " || Q || code[t_] || Q || ", -" || N
  end t_
txt = txt.strip("T", N)
txt = txt.delstr(txt.lastpos(","), 1)

K = ""
K[0] = 5
K[1] = A"NL"
K[2] = A"AMP"
K[3] = A"ESC"
K[4] = A"QS"
K[5] = A"REP"
loop c_ = 0 for code.length
  loop v_ = 1 to K[0]
    T = K[v_]
    if code[c_].pos(T) <> 0 then do
      parse code[c_] pre(T)post
      select case T
        when K[1] then do
          code[c_] = pre || S || "n" || post
          end
        when K[2] then do
          code[c_] = pre || A || post
          end
        when K[3] then do
          code[c_] = pre || S || S || post
          end
        when K[4] then do
          code[c_] = pre || Q || post
          end
        when K[5] then do
          code[c_] = txt
          end
        otherwise nop
        end
      end
    end v_
  pgm = pgm || code[c_].strip("T") || N
  end c_
pgm = pgm.strip("T", N) || N
say pgm

return

NewLISP


(lambda (s) (print (list s (list 'quote s))))

Nim

The empty program is a quine in Nim:



Another quine:

```nim
const x = "var x = echo x[0..7],chr(34),x,chr(34),chr(10),x[8 .. ^1]"
echo x[0..7],chr(34),x,chr(34),chr(10),x[8 .. ^1]

This quine prints its own sourcecode at compiletime as well as at runtime:

const x = "const x = |const y = x[0..9]&34.chr&x&34.chr&10.chr&x[11..100]&10.chr&x[102..115]&10.chr&x[117 .. ^1]|static: echo y|echo y"
const y = x[0..9]&34.chr&x&34.chr&10.chr&x[11..100]&10.chr&x[102..115]&10.chr&x[117 .. ^1]
static: echo y
echo y

Compile with: nim --verbosity:0 c quine

=={{header|NS-HUBASIC}}== 10 LIST




## Objeck


```ocaml
class Program { function : Main(args : String[]) ~ Nil { s := "class Program { function : Main(args : String[]) ~ Nil { s :=;  IO.Console->Print(s->SubString(61))->Print(34->As(Char))->Print(s)->Print(34->As(Char))->PrintLine(s->SubString(61, 129)); } }";  IO.Console->Print(s->SubString(61))->Print(34->As(Char))->Print(s)->Print(34->As(Char))->PrintLine(s->SubString(61, 129)); } }

OCaml

(newline included)

(fun p -> Printf.printf p (string_of_format p)) "(fun p -> Printf.printf p (string_of_format p)) %S;;\n";;

Alternative: (newline included)

(fun s -> Printf.printf "%s%S;;\n" s s) "(fun s -> Printf.printf \"%s%S;;\\n\" s s) ";;

Oforth

"dup 34 emit print 34 emit BL emit print" dup 34 emit print 34 emit BL emit print

Ol

Like others Lisps,

((lambda (s) (display (list s (list (quote quote) s)))) (quote (lambda (s) (display (list s (list (quote quote) s))))))

ooRexx

Cheating

say sourceline(1)

===Non-Cheating, with INTERPRET===

r="say'r='x2c(22)r||22~x2c';interpret r'";interpret r

===Non-Cheating, without INTERPRET===

r=";say'r=.'r'.'r~changestr(.,'22'x,2)";say'r="'r'"'r~changestr(.,'22'x,2)

===Non-Cheating, without INTERPRET, with unprintable characters=== Note: This version will not work correctly on an ASCII machine (where '07'x is the '''bell''' control code),

:: it will only work correctly on an EBCDIC machine (where '07'x is the '''del''' control code).

The two unprintable characters are '07'x. Somewhat difficult to enter, but still a perfectly valid ooRexx program (and Quine).

r=";say'r=�'r'�'r~bitor(,' ')";say'r="'r'"'r~bitor(,' ')

OxygenBasic


'RUNTIME COMPILING

source="print source"

a=compile source : call a : freememory a

Oz

A one-liner that uses the ASCII code for " to avoid "quoted quotes". We put the value assignment to the end by using multithreading and implicit synchronization on the dataflow variable I.

declare I in thread {System.showInfo I#[34]#I#[34]} end I ="declare I in thread {System.showInfo I#[34]#I#[34]} end I ="

PARI/GP

()->quine

Assign this source code to variable quine:

quine=()->quine

Output of interpreter:

gp > quine
()->quine

gp > quine()
()->quine

gp > quine == quine()
1

The last command tests if source code in variable ''quine'' is equal to output of executed function ''quine()''. This is true (''1'').

Pascal

A modification of one Pascal example (Author: Oliver Heen) from http://www.nyx.net/~gthompso/self_pasc.txt. This example includes newline at the end.

const s=';begin writeln(#99#111#110#115#116#32#115#61#39,s,#39,s)end.';begin writeln(#99#111#110#115#116#32#115#61#39,s,#39,s)end.

This version does compile in Free Pascal and UCSD Pascal. Newline included.

program Quine(Output);const A='program Quine(Output);const A=';B='begin writeln(A,char(39),A,char(39),char(59),char(66),char(61),char(39),B,char(39),char(59),B)end.';begin writeln(A,char(39),A,char(39),char(59),char(66),char(61),char(39),B,char(39),char(59),B)end.

A quality quine should not depend on a particular character set. This version also works on systems limited to 80-character lines and on legacy word-based systems which require literal strings to be packed and of a fixed size if assigned to an array.

program main(output);type string=packed array[1..60]of char;
var l:array[1..9]of string; c:array[1..7]of char; i:integer;
lc, a, o, k, n, e, s, t:char; begin
l[1]:='program main(output);type string=packed array[1..60]of char;';
l[2]:='var l:array[1..9]of string; c:array[1..7]of char; i:integer;';
l[3]:='lc, a, o, k, n, e, s, t:char; begin                         ';
l[4]:='for i := 1 to 3 do writeln(l[i]);                           ';
l[5]:='a:=c[1];t:=c[2];o:=c[3];k:=c[4];n:=c[5];e:=c[6];s:=c[7];    ';
l[6]:='for i := 1 to 9 do writeln(a,o,i:1,k,n,e,lc,l[i],lc,s);     ';
l[7]:='writeln(a, t, n, e, lc, lc, lc, lc, s);                     ';
l[8]:='for i := 1 to 7 do write(t,o,i:1,k,n,e,lc,c[i],lc,s);       ';
l[9]:='writeln; for i := 4 to 9 do writeln(l[i]); end.             ';
lc:='''';
c[1]:='l';c[2]:='c';c[3]:='[';c[4]:=']';c[5]:=':';c[6]:='=';c[7]:=';';
for i := 1 to 3 do writeln(l[i]);
a:=c[1];t:=c[2];o:=c[3];k:=c[4];n:=c[5];e:=c[6];s:=c[7];
for i := 1 to 9 do writeln(a,o,i:1,k,n,e,lc,l[i],lc,s);
writeln(a, t, n, e, lc, lc, lc, lc, s);
for i := 1 to 7 do write(t,o,i:1,k,n,e,lc,c[i],lc,s);
writeln; for i := 4 to 9 do writeln(l[i]); end.

Perl

This relatively simple Perl example imitates the C example.

$s = q($s = q(%s); printf($s, $s);
); printf($s, $s);

Note the terminating newline.

===Self-reading (some consider cheating)=== Accessing source code via DATA filehandle:

seek(DATA, 0, 0);
print <DATA>
__DATA__

even simpler:

open ME, $0 and print <ME>;



### Quine Generator


Perhaps the simplest quine in Perl 5 is:

```Perl
$_=q{print"\$_=q{$_};eval"};eval

By carefully examining the code, you will find that you can insert any valid perl sentences before and after the print statement in q{}. It is just a few lines of codes away before you come up with a quine generator that turns a given perl script into a quine. Note this quine generator itself is a quine.

cf. [http://blog.livedoor.jp/dankogai/archives/51519405.html http://blog.livedoor.jp/dankogai/archives/51519405.html]

{local$_=q{
{
    package Quine;
    use strict;
    use warnings;
    our $VERSION = sprintf "%d.%02d", q$Revision: 0.2 $ =~ /(\d+)/g;
    my $head = '{local$_=q' . "\x7B\n";
    my $tail = 'print"{local\$_=q{$_};eval}\n"' . "\x7D;eval}\n";

    sub new {
        my $class = shift;
        my $quine = $head . shift;
        my $ret   = shift || 1;
        my $ln    = ( $quine =~ tr/\n/\n/ );
        $ln++;
        $quine .= "return $ret if caller(1)or(caller)[2]!=$ln;$tail";
        bless \$quine, $class;
    }

    sub from_file {
        my ( $class, $fn, $ret ) = @_;
        local $/;
        open my $fh, '<', $fn or die "$fn : $!";
        my $src = <$fh>;
        close $fh;
        $class->new( $src, $ret );
    }

    sub quine { ${ $_[0] } }

=head1 NAME

Quine - turn your perl modules/apps into a true quine!

=head1 VERSION

$Id: Quine.pm,v 0.2 2010/09/15 20:23:53 dankogai Exp dankogai $

=head1 SYNOPSIS

  use Quine;
  print Quine->from_file("woot.pl")->quine;
  print Quine->from_file("moot.psgi", '$app')->quine;

=cut
}
return 1 if caller(1);print"{local\$_=q{$_};eval}\n"};eval}

Perl 6

{{trans|Haskell}} {{works with|Rakudo|#32 "Pisa"}}

my &f = {say $^s, $^s.perl;}; f "my \&f = \{say \$^s, \$^s.perl;}; f "

Note the terminating newline.

{{works with|Rakudo|2014.04}} A more compact, but still purely functional, approach:

{.fmt($_).say}(<{.fmt($_).say}(<%s>)>)

Note again the terminating newline.

Phix

Credit: Aidan Bindoff

constant c="constant c=%sprintf(1,c,{34&c&34})"printf(1,c,{34&c&34})

PHP

{{trans|C}}

<?php $p = '<?php $p = %c%s%c; printf($p,39,$p,39); ?>
'; printf($p,39,$p,39); ?>

Note the terminating newline.

Technically, anything outside of <?php , <script language="php">, <? (deprecated) or <% (deprecated) tags is automatically echoed by PHP allowing for easier inclusion of HTML in PHP documents. So the following is a quine:

Rosetta code :).

PicoLisp

===Using 'quote'=== Note that 'quote' in PicoLisp corresponds to 'lambda' in other Lisps

('((X) (list (lit X) (lit X))) '((X) (list (lit X) (lit X))))

{{out}}

-> ('((X) (list (lit X) (lit X))) '((X) (list (lit X) (lit X))))

===Using 'let'===

(let X '(list 'let 'X (lit X) X) (list 'let 'X (lit X) X))

{{out}}

-> (let X '(list 'let 'X (lit X) X) (list 'let 'X (lit X) X))

PlainTeX

Output to terminal

This assumes the filename of the source file to be ‘q.tex’, and the banner from vanilla Knuth’s TeX:

This is TeX, Version 3.1415926 (no format preloaded)
(q.tex \output {\message {\output \the \output \end }\batchmode }\end

Output to dvi

    \let~\expandafter\def\0{~\ttraggedright~\let~\s~\string~\def~~~{~\s~~~\s~}~\output~
~{~}~\s~\let~~~\expandafter~\s~\def~\s~\0~\s~{~\0~\s~}~\s~\0~\end}\0

PL/I

The following code, containing 709 significant bytes, compiles completely clean using the old MVS PL/I V2.3.0 Compiler, using the default 2,72,1 margins:

 s:proc options(main)reorder;dcl sysprint file,m(7)init(
 ' s:proc options(main)reorder\dcl sysprint file,m(7)init(',
 ' *)char(99),i,j,(translate,substr)builtin,c char\i=1\j=n',
 ' \do i=1 to 6\put skip list('' '''''')\do j=2 to 56\c=substr',
 ' (m(i),j)\put edit(c)(a)\n:proc\put list(translate(m(i),',
 ' ''5e''x,''e0''x))\end n\if c='''''''' then put edit(c)(a)\end\ ',
 ' put edit('''''','')(a(50))\end\do i=2 to 6\j=n\end\end s\  ',
 *)char(99),i,j,(translate,substr)builtin,c char;i=1;j=n
 ;do i=1 to 6;put skip list(' ''');do j=2 to 56;c=substr
 (m(i),j);put edit(c)(a);n:proc;put list(translate(m(i),
 '5e'x,'e0'x));end n;if c='''' then put edit(c)(a);end;
 put edit(''',')(a(50));end;do i=2 to 6;j=n;end;end s;

An even smaller version (believed to be the smallest possible PL/I Quine), containing 326 significant bytes, shows the unique capabilities of the same old V2.3.0 compiler in being able to generate correct code, ovecoming 2 pre-processor errors, 8 severe errors, 10 errors, 6 warnings and 2 informational messages. It requires the following non-default compile options, 'M,MAR(1,90),C'.

%dcl z%z='put edit';proc options(main;q=''''put list(m;do i=1,2;z(q)skip;do j=
1to 78c=substr(m(i),j;if c=q z(c;z(c;end;z(q',';dcl(c,q)char,m(2)char(99)init(
'%dcl z%z=''put edit'';proc options(main;q=''''''''put list(m;do i=1,2;z(q)skip;do j=',
'1to 78c=substr(m(i),j;if c=q z(c;z(c;end;z(q'','';dcl(c,q)char,m(2)char(99)init(',

The equivalent version that compiles with the newer z/OS Enterprise PL/I compilers, coming in at 434 significant bytes and requiring the following two compiler options, 'm,margins(1,80,0)', is:

%dcl z;%z="put edit";w:proc options(main);q="'";put list(m)do i=1,2,3;z
(q)(a)skip;do j=1to 71;c=substr(m(i),j)if c=q then z(c)(a)z(c)(a)end;if
i<3then z(q,",")(a)else z(q,";")(a)end;dcl(c,q)char,m(3)char(99)init(
'%dcl z;%z="put edit";w:proc options(main);q="''";put list(m)do i=1,2,3;z',
'(q)(a)skip;do j=1to 71;c=substr(m(i),j)if c=q then z(c)(a)z(c)(a)end;if',
'i<3then z(q,",")(a)else z(q,";")(a)end;dcl(c,q)char,m(3)char(99)init(  ';

PowerBASIC

This is ''technically'' based on the [[#BASIC|BASIC]] code above, but is in fact a complete rewrite.

FUNCTION PBMAIN () AS LONG
    REDIM s(1 TO DATACOUNT) AS STRING
    o$ = READ$(1)
    d$ = READ$(2)
    FOR n& = 1 TO DATACOUNT
        s(n&) = READ$(n&)
    NEXT
    OPEN o$ FOR OUTPUT AS 1
    FOR n& = 3 TO DATACOUNT - 1
        PRINT #1, s(n&)
    NEXT
    PRINT #1,
    FOR n& = 1 TO DATACOUNT
        PRINT #1, d$ & $DQ & s(n&) & $DQ
    NEXT
    PRINT #1, s(DATACOUNT)
    CLOSE

    DATA "output.src"
    DATA "    DATA "
    DATA "FUNCTION PBMAIN () AS LONG"
    DATA "    REDIM s(1 TO DATACOUNT) AS STRING"
    DATA "    o$ = READ$(1)"
    DATA "    d$ = READ$(2)"
    DATA "    FOR n& = 1 TO DATACOUNT"
    DATA "        s(n&) = READ$(n&)"
    DATA "    NEXT"
    DATA "    OPEN o$ FOR OUTPUT AS 1"
    DATA "    FOR n& = 3 TO DATACOUNT - 1"
    DATA "        PRINT #1, s(n&)"
    DATA "    NEXT"
    DATA "    PRINT #1,"
    DATA "    FOR n& = 1 TO DATACOUNT"
    DATA "        PRINT #1, d$ & $DQ & s(n&) & $DQ"
    DATA "    NEXT"
    DATA "    PRINT #1, s(DATACOUNT)"
    DATA "    CLOSE"
    DATA "END FUNCTION"
END FUNCTION

PowerShell

{{works with|PowerShell|2}} Adapted from Liberty BASIC.


$S = '$S = $S.Substring(0,5) + [string][char]39 + $S + [string][char]39 + [string][char]10 + $S.Substring(5)'
$S.Substring(0,5) + [string][char]39 + $S + [string][char]39 + [string][char]10 + $S.Substring(5)

{{out}}


$S = '$S = $S.Substring(0,5) + [string][char]39 + $S + [string][char]39 + [string][char]10 + $S.Substring(5)'
$S.Substring(0,5) + [string][char]39 + $S + [string][char]39 + [string][char]10 + $S.Substring(5)

Variations to access the code directly

In a saved script


$MyInvocation.MyCommand.ScriptContents

At the command line


$MyInvocation.MyCommand.Definition

In a function


function Quine { $MyInvocation.MyCommand.Definition }

Prolog

One method to produce a quine is to read the data structures that hold the source code:

quine :-
	listing(quine).

Producing a quine without cheating is more complex. The following program produces a data structure equivalent to the program itself, then outputs it:

quine:-asserta(a((quine:-asserta(a(A,B)),a(C,D+E),a(D,E),numbervars(C),write(C),write(.)),A+B)),a(F,G+H),a(G,H),numbervars(F),write(F),write(.).

The use of numbervars is a GNU Prolog extension that fixes the variable names in the output to be single letters, in alphabetical order by appearance, and thus match the original program. Removing it, the quine still works, but the variable names in the output will probably be different; thus, it will produce a program equivalent to itself, rather than an exact copy of itself.

A version that is source-code-centric rather than AST-centric, and does not rely on any built-in facilities for formatted printing, might look as follows:

% Tested with SWI-Prolog version 7.1.37
:- initialization(main).

before(Lines) :- Lines = [
  "% Tested with SWI-Prolog version 7.1.37",
  ":- initialization(main).",
  "",
  "before(Lines) :- Lines = ["
].

after(Lines) :- Lines = [
  "].",
  "",
  "% replaces quotes by harmless ats",
  "% replaces backslashes by harmless slashes",
  "% replaces linebreaks by harmless sharps",
  "maskCode(34, 64).",
  "maskCode(92, 47).",
  "maskCode(10, 35).",
  "maskCode(X, X).",
  "",
  "% Encodes dangerous characters in a string",
  "encode(D, S) :- ",
  "  string_codes(D, DC),",
  "  maplist(maskCode, DC, SC),",
  "  string_codes(S, SC).",
  "",
  "decode(S, D) :- ",
  "  string_codes(S, SC),",
  "  maplist(maskCode, DC, SC),",
  "  string_codes(D, DC).",
  "",
  "% writes each entry indented by two spaces,",
  "% enclosed in quotes and separated by commas,",
  "% with a newline between the list entries.",
  "mkStringList([],@@).",
  "mkStringList([Single],Out) :-",
  "  atomics_to_string([@  /@@, Single, @/@@], Out).",
  "",
  "mkStringList([H|T], Res) :-",
  "  mkStringList(T, TailRes),",
  "  atomics_to_string([@  /@@, H, @/@,/n@, TailRes], Res).",
  "",
  "quine(Q) :- ",
  "  before(BeforeEncoded),",
  "  after(AfterEncoded),",
  "  maplist(decode, BeforeEncoded, BeforeDecoded),",
  "  maplist(decode,  AfterEncoded, AfterDecoded),",
  "  atomic_list_concat(BeforeDecoded, @/n@, B),",
  "  atomic_list_concat(AfterDecoded, @/n@, A),",
  "  mkStringList(BeforeEncoded, BeforeData),",
  "  mkStringList(AfterEncoded, AfterData),",
  "  Center = @/n]./n/nafter(Lines) :- Lines = [/n@,",
  "  atomic_list_concat([",
  "     B, @/n@, BeforeData, ",
  "     Center, ",
  "     AfterData, @/n@, A, @/n@",
  "  ], Q).",
  "",
  "main :- (quine(Q), write(Q);true),halt.",
  "% line break in the end of file is important"
].

% replaces quotes by harmless ats
% replaces backslashes by harmless slashes
% replaces linebreaks by harmless sharps
maskCode(34, 64).
maskCode(92, 47).
maskCode(10, 35).
maskCode(X, X).

% Encodes dangerous characters in a string
encode(D, S) :-
  string_codes(D, DC),
  maplist(maskCode, DC, SC),
  string_codes(S, SC).

decode(S, D) :-
  string_codes(S, SC),
  maplist(maskCode, DC, SC),
  string_codes(D, DC).

% writes each entry indented by two spaces,
% enclosed in quotes and separated by commas,
% with a newline between the list entries.
mkStringList([],"").
mkStringList([Single],Out) :-
  atomics_to_string(["  \"", Single, "\""], Out).

mkStringList([H|T], Res) :-
  mkStringList(T, TailRes),
  atomics_to_string(["  \"", H, "\",\n", TailRes], Res).

quine(Q) :-
  before(BeforeEncoded),
  after(AfterEncoded),
  maplist(decode, BeforeEncoded, BeforeDecoded),
  maplist(decode,  AfterEncoded, AfterDecoded),
  atomic_list_concat(BeforeDecoded, "\n", B),
  atomic_list_concat(AfterDecoded, "\n", A),
  mkStringList(BeforeEncoded, BeforeData),
  mkStringList(AfterEncoded, AfterData),
  Center = "\n].\n\nafter(Lines) :- Lines = [\n",
  atomic_list_concat([
     B, "\n", BeforeData,
     Center,
     AfterData, "\n", A, "\n"
  ], Q).

main :- (quine(Q), write(Q);true),halt.
% line break in the end of file is important

It could be made shorter. This version contains some introns that have been used for code generation (like the encode/2 predicate, that is not really needed).

PureBasic

s$="s$= : Debug Mid(s$,1,3)+Chr(34)+s$+Chr(34)+Mid(s$,4,100)" : Debug Mid(s$,1,3)+Chr(34)+s$+Chr(34)+Mid(s$,4,100)

Python

{{works with|Python|2.x and 3.x}} A simple and straightforward quine. Character chr(34) is a double quote, and chr(10) is a new line (Author: J. C. Lucero).


w = "print('w = ' + chr(34) + w + chr(34) + chr(10) + w)"
print('w = ' + chr(34) + w + chr(34) + chr(10) + w)


{{works with|Python|2.x and 3.x}} Python's %r format conversion uses the repr() function to return a string containing the source code representation of its argument:

x = 'x = %r\nprint(x %% x)'
print(x % x)

{{works with|Python|3.x and 2.6+}} With the new str.format:

x = 'x = {!r};print(x.format(x))';print(x.format(x))

{{works with|Python|2.x and 3.x}} After creating the file "Quine.py" with the following source, running the program will spit the code back out on a terminal window:

import sys; sys.stdout.write(open(sys.argv[0]).read())

Note: actually an empty file could be treated as python quine too.

{{works with|Python|2.x and 3.x}}

import sys,inspect;sys.stdout.write(inspect.getsource(inspect.currentframe()))

Due to Leon Naley (name guessed) from [http://forums.devshed.com/python-programming-11/2nd-shortest-quine-in-python-ever-937355.html#post2845853 devshed python forum]

''I think I just thought of the shortest quine for python I think there can ever be! (except a blank program)

make a program with this single line in it


print(__file__[:-3])

and name the file print(file[:-3]).py

and run the file!''

bash example command:

$ python print\(__file__\[\:-3\]\).py
print(__file__[:-3])

Python 3, from same thread at same forum, created by wewhgyih, tested by LambertDW. Works on unix and Windows7. On Windows7 I commanded python "print(file)" .


$ cat print\(__file__\)
print(__file__)
$ python print\(__file__\)
print(__file__)

I saw this clever solution somewhere some time ago (dont' remember the source.) Assuming the input does not have to be a correct program... $ cat reproducing.py File "reproducing.py", line 1 File "reproducing.py", line 1 ^ IndentationError: unexpected indent

$ python reproducing.py File "reproducing.py", line 1 File "reproducing.py", line 1 ^ IndentationError: unexpected indent



----

Here's a few by me (Nathaniel Virgo). They represent attempts to make clean, readable "Pythonic" quines. The first one is straightforward, using format and chr(34) to construct a multiline string:


```python

x = """x = {0}{1}{0}
print x.format(chr(34)*3,x)"""
print x.format(chr(34)*3,x)

This next one uses a base64 encoding, which is an off-the-shelf way to pack strings containing quotes and newlines etc. into ones that consist only of printable characters. Python purists will probably tell me I should have used the base64 package instead.


a = 'YSA9ICcnCmIgPSBhLmRlY29kZSgnYmFzZTY0JykKcHJpbnQgYls6NV0rYStiWzU6XQ=='
b = a.decode('base64')
print b[:5]+a+b[5:]

In the above quine I felt it was inelegant to hard code the insertion of the data after the 5th character and I wondered if I could do it in a cleaner way. Eventually I came up with this:


data = (
	'ZGF0YSA9ICgKCSc=',
	'JywKCSc=',
	'JwopCnByZWZpeCwgc2VwYXJhdG9yLCBzdWZmaXggPSAoZC5kZWNvZGUoJ2Jhc2U2NCcpIGZvciBkIGluIGRhdGEpCnByaW50IHByZWZpeCArIGRhdGFbMF0gKyBzZXBhcmF0b3IgKyBkYXRhWzFdICsgc2VwYXJhdG9yICsgZGF0YVsyXSArIHN1ZmZpeA=='
)
prefix, separator, suffix = (d.decode('base64') for d in data)
print prefix + data[0] + separator + data[1] + separator + data[2] + suffix

Finally, here's one that echoes the classic "Y combinator" way of constructing quines. First we define a function that takes some code, wraps it in a function and then applies than function to its own source code, then we apply that function to its own source code:


def applyToOwnSourceCode(functionBody):
	print "def applyToOwnSourceCode(functionBody):"
	print functionBody
	print "applyToOwnSourceCode(" + repr(functionBody) + ")"
applyToOwnSourceCode('\tprint "def applyToOwnSourceCode(functionBody):"\n\tprint functionBody\n\tprint "applyToOwnSourceCode(" + repr(functionBody) + ")"')

R

Adapted from the C version in this list.

(function(){x<-intToUtf8(34);s<-"(function(){x<-intToUtf8(34);s<-%s%s%s;cat(sprintf(s,x,s,x))})()";cat(sprintf(s,x,s,x))})()

Another version, perhaps more understandable.


src <- "\nwriteLines(c(paste(\"src <-\", encodeString(src, quote='\"')), src))"

writeLines(c(paste("src <-", encodeString(src, quote='"')), src))

Racket

The classic:

((λ (x) `(,x ',x)) '(λ (x) `(,x ',x)))

As a module:

(module quine racket
  (pretty-write
   ((λ (x) `(module quine racket (pretty-write (,x ',x))))
    '(λ (x) `(module quine racket (pretty-write (,x ',x)))))))

As a module via #lang line:

#lang racket
((λ(x)(printf "#lang racket\n(~a\n ~s)" x x))
 "(λ(x)(printf \"#lang racket\\n(~a\\n ~s)\" x x))")

REBOL

rebol [] q: [print ["rebol [] q:" mold q "do q"]] do q

REXX

version 1

/*REXX program outputs its own 1─line source.*/    say sourceline(1)

{{out|output}}


/*REXX program outputs its own 1─line source.*/    say sourceline(1)

version 2

/*REXX program outputs its own multi─line source.*/

    do j=1  for sourceline()
    say sourceline(j)
    end   /*j*/

{{out|output}}


/*REXX program outputs its own multi─line source.*/

    do j=1  for sourceline()
    say sourceline(j)
    end   /*j*/

version 3

A version that doesn't use sourceline() which is kind of a cheat.

---But it ''is'' allowed (see the 2nd bullet point in the task's preamble).

'''Error?''' ''The rest of this conversation moved to [[Talk:Quine|Talk]]''

/* Rexx */

Q = "'"
Queue '/* Rexx */'
Queue ''
Queue 'Q = "$"'
Queue '&QQQ'
Queue ''
Queue 'X = 0'
Queue 'Do while Queued() \= 0'
Queue '  Parse pull code'
Queue '  X = X + 1; codel.0 = X; codel.X = code'
Queue '  End'
Queue ''
Queue 'Do x_ = 1 for codel.0'
Queue '  line = codel.x_'
Queue '  If abbrev(line, "Q = ") then Do'
Queue '    line = translate(line, Q, "$")'
Queue '    End'
Queue '  If line = "&QQQ" then Do'
Queue '    Do y_ = 1 to codel.0'
Queue '      qline = codel.y_'
Queue '      Say "Queue" Q || qline || Q'
Queue '      End y_'
Queue '    End'
Queue '  else Do'
Queue '    Say line'
Queue '    End'
Queue '  End x_'
Queue ''

X = 0
Do while Queued() \= 0
  Parse pull code
  X = X + 1; codel.0 = X; codel.X = code
  End

Do x_ = 1 for codel.0
  line = codel.x_
  If abbrev(line, "Q = ") then Do
    line = translate(line, Q, "$")
    End
  If line = "&QQQ" then Do
    Do y_ = 1 to codel.0
      qline = codel.y_
      Say "Queue" Q || qline || Q
      End y_
    End
  else Do
    Say line
    End
  End x_

Ring

v = "see substr(`v = ` + char(34) + `@` + char(34) + nl + `@` ,`@`,v)"
see substr(`v = ` + char(34) + `@` + char(34) + nl + `@` ,`@`,v)

Ruby

Found online:

$ ruby -e '_="_=%p;puts _%%_";puts _%_'
_="_=%p;puts _%%_";puts _%_
$ ruby -e '_="_=%p;puts _%%_";puts _%_' | ruby
_="_=%p;puts _%%_";puts _%_

more readably:

x = "x = %p; puts x %% x"; puts x % x

The %p specifier outputs the result of calling the .inspect method on the argument.

even shorter (by a few characters):

puts <<e*2,'e'
puts <<e*2,'e'
e

perhaps the simplest:

eval s="puts'eval s='+s.inspect"

One (maybe a bit verbose) version, to be appended to the end of any file. This doesn't work in IRB, because it isn't a file.


f = File.open __FILE__
f.each_line do |line|
 puts line
f.close

or


p open(__FILE__).read

Rust

A short quine (works with Rust 1.3.0):

fn main() {
    let x = "fn main() {\n    let x = ";
    let y = "print!(\"{}{:?};\n    let y = {:?};\n    {}\", x, x, y, y)\n}\n";
    print!("{}{:?};
    let y = {:?};
    {}", x, x, y, y)
}

Using the method on Wikipedia (0.9-pre-compatible, does not compile on Rust 1.0.0 and newer):


fn main()
{
        let q = 34u8;
        let p = 44u8;
        let l = [
        "fn main()",
        "{",
        "        let q = 34u8;",
        "        let p = 44u8;",
        "        let l = [",
        "        ",
        "        ];",
        "        let mut i = 0;",
        "        while i < 5",
        "        {",
        "                println(l[i]);",
        "                i+=1;",
        "        }",
        "        i = 0;",
        "        while i < l.len()",
        "        {",
        "                print(l[5]);",
        "                print((q as char).to_str());",
        "                print(l[i]);",
        "                print((q as char).to_str());",
        "                println((p as char).to_str());",
        "                i+=1;",
        "        }",
        "        i = 6;",
        "        while i < l.len()",
        "        {",
        "                println(l[i]);",
        "                i+=1;",
        "        }",
        "}",
        ];
        let mut i = 0;
        while i < 5
        {
                println(l[i]);
                i+=1;
        }
        i = 0;
        while i < l.len()
        {
                print(l[5]);
                print((q as char).to_str());
                print(l[i]);
                print((q as char).to_str());
                println((p as char).to_str());
                i+=1;
        }
        i = 6;
        while i < l.len()
        {
                println(l[i]);
                i+=1;
        }
}

A quine in the shape of a circle:


                                                      fn main(){let q:&[u8]=&[
                                                32,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,61,27,80,82,
                                       73,78,84,76,78,01,08,02,91,93,70,78,00,77,65,73,78,08,
                                 09,91,91,76,69,84,00,81,26,06,59,85,24,61,29,06,59,02,12,00,51,84,
                              82,73,78,71,26,26,70,82,79,77,63,85,84,70,24,08,86,69,67,01,59,66,07,00,
                           07,27,00,21,20,61,09,14,85,78,87,82,65,80,08,09,09,27,76,69,84,00,82,29,08,81,
                     14,76,69,78,08,09,65,83,00,70,22,20,15,83,84,68,26,26,70,22,20,32,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,
                  00,26,26,67,79,78,83,84,83,26,26,48,41,09,14,83,81,82,84,08,09,65,83,00,73,19,18,11,20,27,76,69,
                  84,00,77,85,84,00,66,26,00,54,69,67,28,08,73,19,18,12,00,73,19,18,09,00,30,29,00,54,69,67,26,26,
               78,69,87,08,09,27,00,15,10,00,00,00,79,79,69,82,00,00,10,15,00,76,69,84,00,77,85,84,00,88,29,82,13,17,
            27,00,76,69,84,00,77,85,84,00,89,29,16,27,32,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,76,69,84,00,77,85,84,00,75,29,17,
         27,76,69,84,00,77,85,84,00,74,29,17,27,76,69,84,00,77,85,84,00,69,29,75,00,13,08,82,28,28,17,09,27,87,72,73,76,69,
         00,88,30,29,89,91,66,14,80,85,83,72,08,08,82,11,88,12,82,11,89,09,09,27,66,14,80,85,83,72,08,08,82,11,89,12,82,11,
      88,09,09,27,00,66,14,80,85,83,72,08,08,82,13,89,12,82,11,88,09,32,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,09,27,66,14,80,
      85,83,72,08,08,82,13,88,12,00,82,11,89,09,09,27,66,14,80,85,83,72,08,08,82,13,88,12,82,13,89,09,09,27,66,14,80,85,83,72,
      08,08,82,13,89,12,82,13,88,09,09,27,00,66,14,80,85,83,72,08,08,82,11,89,12,82,13,88,09,09,27,66,14,80,85,83,72,08,08,82,
   11,88,12,82,13,89,09,09,27,00,73,70,00,69,28,29,16,91,32,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,89,11,29,17,27,69,11,
   29,74,27,74,11,29,18,27,93,73,70,00,69,30,16,00,91,88,13,29,17,27,75,11,29,18,27,69,11,29,75,13,08,82,28,28,17,09,27,93,93,76,
   69,84,00,77,85,84,00,84,29,81,14,73,84,69,82,08,09,27,07,79,26,70,79,82,00,89,00,73,78,00,17,14,14,82,10,18,00,91,00,76,69,84,
   00,76,26,00,54,69,67,32,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,28,73,19,18,30,00,29,00,66,14,73,84,69,82,08,
   09,14,70,73,76,84,69,82,08,92,88,92,00,88,14,17,29,29,89,09,14,77,65,80,08,92,88,92,00,88,14,16,09,14,67,79,76,76,69,67,84,08,
   09,27,00,76,69,84,00,88,00,29,00,76,14,73,84,69,82,08,09,14,67,76,79,78,69,68,08,09,14,70,79,76,68,08,16,12,32,00,00,00,00,00,
   00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,73,19,18,26,26,77,65,88,09,27,00,76,69,84,00,78,00,29,76,14,73,84,69,82,08,09,
   14,67,76,79,78,69,68,08,09,14,70,79,76,68,08,25,25,25,12,00,73,19,18,26,26,77,73,78,09,27,76,69,84,00,77,29,88,13,78,27,00,70,
   79,82,00,63,00,73,78,00,16,14,14,78,00,91,00,80,82,73,78,84,01,32,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,
   00,00,00,00,08,02,00,00,00,02,09,27,93,70,79,82,00,63,00,73,78,00,16,14,14,77,91,00,73,70,00,76,69,84,00,51,79,77,69,08,86,09,
   00,29,00,84,14,78,69,88,84,08,09,00,91,80,82,73,78,84,01,08,02,91,26,16,18,93,12,02,12,86,09,27,93,00,69,76,83,69,91,00,66,82,
   69,65,75,32,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,07,79,27,00,93,93,00,80,82,73,
   78,84,01,08,02,60,78,02,09,27,00,93,00,70,79,82,00,78,00,73,78,00,81,14,73,84,69,82,08,09,00,91,00,80,82,73,78,84,01,08,02,91,
      93,02,12,00,08,73,70,00,10,78,29,29,19,18,91,17,16,93,00,69,76,83,69,32,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,
      00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,91,10,78,11,19,18,93,09,00,65,83,00,67,72,65,82,09,27,93,80,82,73,
      78,84,01,08,02,60,78,02,09,27,93,00,15,15,00,71,73,84,72,85,66,14,67,79,77,15,75,73,82,74,65,86,65,83,67,82,73,80,84,
       ];println!("{}fn main(){{let q:&[u8]=&[", String::from_utf8(vec![b' '; 54]).unwrap());let r=(q.len()as f64/std::f64
         ::consts::PI).sqrt()as i32+4;let mut b: Vec<(i32, i32) >= Vec::new(); /*   ooer  */ let mut x=r-1; let mut y=0;
          let mut k=1;let mut j=1;let mut e=k -(r<<1);while x>=y{b.push((r+x,r+y));b.push((r+y,r+x)); b.push((r-y,r+x)
             );b.push((r-x, r+y));b.push((r-x,r-y));b.push((r-y,r-x)); b.push((r+y,r-x));b.push((r+x,r-y)); if e<=0{
                y+=1;e+=j;j+=2;}if e>0 {x-=1;k+=2;e+=k-(r<<1);}}let mut t=q.iter();'o:for y in 1..r*2 { let l: Vec
                   <i32> = b.iter().filter(|x| x.1==y).map(|x| x.0).collect(); let x = l.iter().cloned().fold(0,
                     i32::max); let n =l.iter().cloned().fold(999, i32::min);let m=x-n; for _ in 0..n { print!
                        ("   ");}for _ in 0..m{ if let Some(v) = t.next() {print!("{:02},",v);} else{ break
                            'o; }} print!("\n"); } for n in q.iter() { print!("{}", (if *n==32{10} else
                                  {*n+32}) as char);}print!("\n");} // github.com/kirjavascript

Scala

script:

val q = "\"" * 3
val c = """val q = "\"" * 3
val c = %s%s%s
println(c format (q, c, q))
"""
println(c format (q, c, q))

application:

object Quine {
  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val q = "\"" * 3
    val c = """object Quine {
  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val q = "\"" * 3
    val c = %s%s%s
    println(c format (q, c, q))
  }
}"""
    println(c format (q, c, q))
  }
}

script, using printf with indexed arguments (proposed here: http://www.codecommit.com/blog/scala/useless-hackery-a-scala-quine):


val x="val x=%c%s%1$c;printf(x,34,x)";printf(x,34,x)

Scheme

{{trans|Common Lisp}} {{Works with|Scheme|R^5RS}}

((lambda (s) (display (list s (list (quote quote) s)))) (quote (lambda (s) (display (list s (list (quote quote) s))))))

or more "directly" (and classically)

((lambda (q) (quasiquote ((unquote q) (quote (unquote q))))) (quote (lambda (q) (quasiquote ((unquote q) (quote (unquote q)))))))

which is a long-hand for "cute"

((lambda (q) `(,q ',q)) '(lambda (q) `(,q ',q)))

Seed7

$ include "seed7_05.s7i";
const array string: prog is [](
"$ include \"seed7_05.s7i\";",
"const array string: prog is [](",
"const proc: main is func",
"  local var integer: number is 0;",
"  begin",
"    for number range 1 to 2 do writeln(prog[number]); end for;",
"    for number range 1 to 11 do",
"      writeln(literal(prog[number]) <& \",\");",
"    end for;",
"    writeln(literal(prog[12]) <& \");\");",
"    for number range 3 to 12 do writeln(prog[number]); end for;",
"  end func;");
const proc: main is func
  local var integer: number is 0;
  begin
    for number range 1 to 2 do writeln(prog[number]); end for;
    for number range 1 to 11 do
      writeln(literal(prog[number]) <& ",");
    end for;
    writeln(literal(prog[12]) <& ");");
    for number range 3 to 12 do writeln(prog[number]); end for;
  end func;

Original source: [http://seed7.sourceforge.net/algorith/puzzles.htm#self]

Sidef

With printf():

s = %(s = %%(%s); printf(s, s);
); printf(s, s);

With HERE-doc:

say(<<e*2, 'e')
say(<<e*2, 'e')
e

Smalltalk

(newline included)

[:s| Transcript show: s, s printString; cr ] value: '[:s| Transcript show: s, s printString; cr ] value: '

{{works with|GNU Smalltalk}} (newline included)

' print; displayNl' print; displayNl

SmileBASIC

Fairly standard with a format string and character codes.

Q$="Q$=%SPRINT FORMAT$(Q$,CHR$(34)+Q$+CHR$(34)+CHR$(10))"
PRINT FORMAT$(Q$,CHR$(34)+Q$+CHR$(34)+CHR$(10))

SPL

There is a [https://bitbucket.org/FlorianPommerening/splquine bootstrapper for a Quine in SPL]. The actual Quine is quite large (3.1 million to 180 thousand lines in this case).

Standard ML

(newline included)

(fn s => print (s ^ "\"" ^ String.toString s ^ "\";\n")) "(fn s => print (s ^ \"\\\"\" ^ String.toString s ^ \"\\\";\\n\")) ";

(without newline)

(fn y=>(fn x=>(print(x^y^x^y)))) (implode[chr(34)])"(fn y=>(fn x=>(print(x^y^x^y)))) (implode[chr(34)])"

Swift

{{works with|Swift|2.x}} (newline included)

({print($0+$0.debugDescription+")")})("({print($0+$0.debugDescription+\")\")})(")

{{works with|Swift|1.x}} (newline included)

{println($0+$0.debugDescription+")")}("{println($0+$0.debugDescription+\")\")}(")

Tcl

There are a number of excellent quines in the Tcl wiki[http://wiki.tcl.tk/730], the most useful for real-world programming probably the one that uses [info] to read the source of the currently running script. But that would be like opening its own source file.

The most straightforward one in the spirit of Quine is probably the one that uses [join], which appends the elements in the list given in its first argument with a "joining string" which is given in the second element of the list. For example the three-element list {} A B (the first element of which is an empty list):

join { {} A B  } any_string
=> any_stringAany_stringB

If "A" and "B" are replaced by literal (i.e. escaped) opening and closing curled braces, the result becomes valid Tcl code:

join { {} \{ \} } something
=> something{something}

and re-assembling these parts with a connecting string that is exactly this operation of re-assembly:

join { {} \{ \} } { join { {} \{ \} } }
=> join { {} \{ \} } { join { {} \{ \} } }

==Turbo {{header|Pascal}}== The following code was tested in Turbo Pascal 5.5 under DOSbox DOS, and using gpc 4.1. It assumes ASCII.

program quine;

const
     apos: Char = Chr(39);
     comma: Char = Chr(44);
     lines: Array[1..17] of String[80] = (
'program quine;',
'',
'const',
'     apos: Char = Chr(39);',
'     comma: Char = Chr(44);',
'     lines: Array[1..17] of String[80] = (',
'     );',
'',
'var',
'   num: Integer;',
'',
'begin',
'     for num := 1 to 6 do writeln(lines[num]);',
'     for num := 1 to 16 do writeln(apos, lines[num], apos, comma);',
'%     writeln(apos, lines[17], apos);',
'     for num := 7 to 17 do writeln(lines[num]);',
'end.'
     );

var
   num: Integer;

begin
     for num := 1 to 6 do writeln(lines[num]);
     for num := 1 to 16 do writeln(apos, lines[num], apos, comma);
     writeln(apos, lines[17], apos);
     for num := 7 to 17 do writeln(lines[num]);
end.

TXR

A suite for four variations on a theme. The first three use HTML encoding to avoid solving quoting problem. The third stops using &#10; to encode newlines, but instead represents the coded portion of the program as a list of lines rather than a string containing newlines encoded in some other way. The fourth dispenses with the HTML crutch and solves the quoting problem with a filter defined in the program itself. ===="double filtered"====

@(deffilter me ("ME" "@(bind me &quot;ME&quot;)&#10;@(output)&#10;@@(deffilter me (&quot;ME&quot; &quot;@{me :filter me}&quot;))&#10;@{me :filter (me :from_html)}&#10;@(end)"))
@(bind me "ME")
@(output)
@@(deffilter me ("ME" "@{me :filter me}"))
@{me :filter (me :from_html)}
@(end)

===="straight up"====

@(bind me "@(output)&#10;@@(bind me &quot;@me&quot;)&#10;@{me :filter :from_html}&#10;@(end)")
@(output)
@@(bind me "@me")
@{me :filter :from_html}
@(end)

===="code free"====

@(bind me ("@(output)" "@@(bind me (@(rep)&quot;@me&quot; @(last)&quot;@me&quot;@(end)))" "@(repeat)" "@{me :filter :from_html}" "@(end)" "@(end)"))
@(output)
@@(bind me (@(rep)"@me" @(last)"@me"@(end)))
@(repeat)
@{me :filter :from_html}
@(end)
@(end)

===="404"====

@(bind me ("@(deffilter q (*'**'*' *'*/*'*') (*'**/*' *'*/*/*') (*'*****' *'***'))" "@(output)" "@@(bind me (@(rep)*'@me*' @(last)*'@me*'@(end)))" "@(repeat)" "@{me :filter q}" "@(end)" "@(end)"))
@(deffilter q ("*'" "\"") ("*/" "\\") ("**" "*"))
@(output)
@@(bind me (@(rep)"@me" @(last)"@me"@(end)))
@(repeat)
@{me :filter q}
@(end)
@(end)

UNIX Shell

{{works with|Bourne Shell}}

A cheat that reads its own source code, because $0 is the path to the script:

#!/bin/sh
cat < "$0"

A cheat that reads its own input using the history command (only works in an interactive shell):

history | tail -n 1 | cut -c 8-

A real quine that doesn't cheat:

{
	string=`cat`
	printf "$string" "$string"
	echo
	echo END-FORMAT
} <<'END-FORMAT'
{
	string=`cat`
	printf "$string" "$string"
	echo
	echo END-FORMAT
} <<'END-FORMAT'
%s
END-FORMAT

V

First we need a function that can print a list as a library.

[p [put ' 'put] map ' ' puts].

with that, the quine reduces to quine.v:

[dup puts p]
dup puts p

Using it: $./v quine.v

[dup puts p]
dup puts p

{{omit from|Brlcad}} {{omit from|GUISS}}

VBA

Inspired bij the Pascal version

Public Sub quine()
    quote = Chr(34)
    comma = Chr(44)
    cont = Chr(32) & Chr(95)
    n = Array( _
"Public Sub quine()", _
"    quote = Chr(34)", _
"    comma = Chr(44)", _
"    cont = Chr(32) & Chr(95)", _
"    n = Array( _", _
"    For i = 0 To 4", _
"        Debug.Print n(i)", _
"    Next i", _
"    For i = 0 To 15", _
"        Debug.Print quote & n(i) & quote & comma & cont", _
"    Next i", _
"    Debug.Print quote & n(15) & quote & Chr(41)", _
"    For i = 5 To 15", _
"        Debug.Print n(i)", _
"    Next i", _
"End Sub")
    For i = 0 To 4
        Debug.Print n(i)
    Next i
    For i = 0 To 14
        Debug.Print quote & n(i) & quote & comma & cont
    Next i
    Debug.Print quote & n(15) & quote & Chr(41)
    For i = 5 To 15
        Debug.Print n(i)
    Next i
End Sub

Verbexx

Note: The input source code would normally include a Byte Order Mark (BOM) at the start. The output written to the console does not contain a BOM -- visually, the output looks the same as the input.

@VAR s = «@SAY (@FORMAT fmt:"@VAR s = %c%s%c;" 0x00AB s 0x00BB) s no_nl:;»; @SAY (@FORMAT fmt:"@VAR s = %c%s%c;" 0x00AB s 0x00BB) s no_nl:;

VHDL

LIBRARY ieee; USE std.TEXTIO.all;
entity quine is end entity quine;
architecture beh of quine is
  type str_array is array(1 to 20) of string(1 to 80);
  constant src : str_array := (
    "LIBRARY ieee; USE std.TEXTIO.all;                                               ",
    "entity quine is end entity quine;                                               ",
    "architecture beh of quine is                                                    ",
    "  type str_array is array(1 to 20) of string(1 to 80);                          ",
    "  constant src : str_array := (                                                 ",
    "begin                                                                           ",
    "  process variable l : line; begin                                              ",
    "    for i in 1 to 5 loop write(l, src(i)); writeline(OUTPUT, l); end loop;      ",
    "    for i in 1 to 20 loop                                                       ",
    "      write(l, character'val(32)&character'val(32));                            ",
    "      write(l, character'val(32)&character'val(32));                            ",
    "      write(l, character'val(34)); write(l, src(i)); write(l,character'val(34));",
    "      if i /= 20 then write(l, character'val(44));                              ",
    "      else            write(l, character'val(41)&character'val(59)); end if;    ",
    "      writeline(OUTPUT, l);                                                     ",
    "    end loop;                                                                   ",
    "    for i in 6 to 20 loop write(l, src(i)); writeline(OUTPUT, l); end loop;     ",
    "    wait;                                                                       ",
    "  end process;                                                                  ",
    "end architecture beh;                                                           ");
begin
  process variable l : line; begin
    for i in 1 to 5 loop write(l, src(i)); writeline(OUTPUT, l); end loop;
    for i in 1 to 20 loop
      write(l, character'val(32)&character'val(32));
      write(l, character'val(32)&character'val(32));
      write(l, character'val(34)); write(l, src(i)); write(l,character'val(34));
      if i /= 20 then write(l, character'val(44));
      else            write(l, character'val(41)&character'val(59)); end if;
      writeline(OUTPUT, l);
    end loop;
    for i in 6 to 20 loop write(l, src(i)); writeline(OUTPUT, l); end loop;
    wait;
  end process;
end architecture beh;

NOTE: ModelSim escapes each line in the console output with "# ".

Visual Basic .NET

Leading newline for appearance.


Module Program
    Sub Main()
        Dim s = "
Module Program
    Sub Main()
        Dim s = {0}{1}{0}
        Console.WriteLine(s, ChrW(34), s)
    End Sub
End Module"
        Console.WriteLine(s, ChrW(34), s)
    End Sub
End Module

Possibly shortest possible (must have strict and explicit off):

Module M
Sub Main
s="Module M
Sub Main
s={0}{1}{0}
Console.Write(s,ChrW(34),s)
End Sub
End Module"
Console.Write(s,ChrW(34),s)
End Sub
End Module

WDTE

 import 'strings';
let v => "let str => import 'strings';\nlet v => {q};\nstr.format v v -- io.writeln io.stdout;";
str.format v v -- io.writeln io.stdout;

x86 Assembly

.global _start;_start:mov $p,%rsi;mov $1,%rax;mov $1,%rdi;mov $255,%rdx;syscall;mov $q,%rsi;mov $1,%rax;mov $1,%rdx;syscall;mov $p,%rsi;mov $1,%rax;mov $255,%rdx;syscall;mov $q,%rsi;mov $1,%rax;mov $1,%rdx;syscall;mov $60,%rax;syscall;q:.byte 34;p:.ascii ".global _start;_start:mov $p,%rsi;mov $1,%rax;mov $1,%rdi;mov $255,%rdx;syscall;mov $q,%rsi;mov $1,%rax;mov $1,%rdx;syscall;mov $p,%rsi;mov $1,%rax;mov $255,%rdx;syscall;mov $q,%rsi;mov $1,%rax;mov $1,%rdx;syscall;mov $60,%rax;syscall;q:.byte 34;p:.ascii "

Compile with `gcc -nostdlib quine.sx` where quine.sx is the filename. This is for GNU Assembler x64 syntax.

Here is the 32 bit version. Compile this with `gcc -nostdlib quine32.sx -m32`. The m32 flag tells gcc to parse the code as 32-bit.
<lang>
.global _start;_start:mov $p,%ecx;mov $4,%eax;mov $1,%ebx;mov $264,%edx;int $0x80;mov $q,%ecx;mov $4,%eax;mov $1,%edx;int $0x80;mov $p,%ecx;mov $4,%eax;mov $264,%edx;int $0x80;mov $q,%ecx;mov $4,%eax;mov $1,%edx;int $0x80;mov $1,%eax;int $0x80;q:.byte 34;p:.ascii ".global _start;_start:mov $p,%ecx;mov $4,%eax;mov $1,%ebx;mov $264,%edx;int $0x80;mov $q,%ecx;mov $4,%eax;mov $1,%edx;int $0x80;mov $p,%ecx;mov $4,%eax;mov $264,%edx;int $0x80;mov $q,%ecx;mov $4,%eax;mov $1,%edx;int $0x80;mov $1,%eax;int $0x80;q:.byte 34;p:.ascii "

For readability, here's a bash one-liner. Again, quine.sx is the filename. If you have the scat highlighter, you can pipe it to that, too. Of course, this breaks the quine, so don't compile this version expecting it to work.


python -c "from pprint import pprint;prog=open('quine.sx', 'r').read().split(';',24);pprint(prog)" | tr "[]" " " | perl -pe "s/( '|'(,| ))//g"

zkl

The simplest is the zkl REPL and integers

zkl: 123
123

{{trans|Groovy}}

s:="s:=%c%s%c;print(s.fmt(34,s,34));";print(s.fmt(34,s,34));

{{trans|ALGOL 68}}

 a:="a:=;q:=(34).toChar();print(a[0,3]+q+a+q+a[3,*]);";q:=(34).toChar();print(a[0,3]+q+a+q+a[3,*]);

{{trans|C}}

reg c=0'|"|,s="reg c=0'|%c|,s=%c%s%c;s.fmt(c,c,s,c).print();";s.fmt(c,c,s,c).print();

{{trans|Python}} Create a file with:

File(__FILE__).readln().print()

and run it: $ zkl foo.zkl to generate the contents.

We can also write a quine tester since print both sends the results to the output device and returns them:

fcn testQuine(quine){
   Compiler.Compiler.compileText(quine).__constructor(); out:=vm.regX;
   println("\ndiff>>",quine-out,"<<");
}

testQuine(0'|s:="s:=%c%s%c;print(s.fmt(34,s,34));";print(s.fmt(34,s,34));|);
s:="s:=%c%s%c;print(s.fmt(34,s,34));";print(s.fmt(34,s,34));
diff>><<